3219: Story Walk

Story Walk - when I started my walk...

A Story Walk is one of those unexpected, delightful ideas that combines three critical elements for overall family health:

  1. early literacy learning
  2. family engagement outdoors and
  3. physical activity. 

Story Walks help build children’s interest in reading while encouraging healthy outdoor activity for both children and grown-ups.Take the walk and enjoy participating in the story along the way.

If you went for a walk, what do you think you might see?

Come on a walk where you will find strange and unexpected animals with me.


Talking with children

It is very important that children have encouraging relationships in their life.

It helps them to build a positive sense of who they are and how they feel about their place in the family and in the community.

Good communication helps to build positive relationships.

Some ways to communicate with children:

  • Look at your child when they are talking to you.
    It shows them that you are listening.
  • Take some time to sit and listen to your child.
    It shows them your are paying attention.
  • Encourage your child’s ideas and opinions. It helps them to be brave.
  • Take turns to listen and speak. It teaches them how to communicate well with you.
  • Use a calm voice when discussing difficult issues.

It helps them to be honest and open.


Did you know there is a library at both ends of the story walk?

  1. Newcomb Library
  2. Bellarine Living and Learning Centre Book Library Monday to Thursday from 9:00am to 3:00pm and Fridays from 9:00am to 12:00pm

Story walk map
Click to Enlarge Image

Map is not drawn to scale


Pause Spot 1

When I started my walk, I was skipping down the track, when I saw a cool cat singing rat-a-tat-tat.

What colour is the cool cat'?

What do you think the cool cat's name might be?

What sounds do cats make?

I saw a cool cat singing rat-a-tat-tat.


Pause Spot 2

I crept on forward and sneaking through the grass, I saw a freaky fox wearing stripy socks.

What animals have stripes?

What other animals sneak through the grass?

What colour are your favourite socks?

What sounds do cats make?

I saw a freaky fox wearing stripy socks.


Pause Spot 3

I hopped along the path, I saw a brown bunny.

He looked at me cross-eyed, I thought it was funny.

What else rhymes with bunny?

What other colours do you know?

What other animals hop?

He looked at me cross-eyed, I thought it was funny.



Pause Spot 4

I heard a loud snore so I peaked around the track, I saw a tired turtle sleeping on his back.

What other things are loud?

What other sounds do animals make?

Where do other animals sleep?

He looked at me cross-eyed, I thought it was funny.



Pause Spot 5

I jumped two times and saw along the path a pack of pesky possums playing in a bath.

What other animals like water?

Where do you like to play?

What time is bath time?

I jumped two times and saw along the path a pack of pesky possums playing in a bath.



Pause Spot 6

When I finished my walk, I sat for a chat with cool Mr Cat, who sang rat-a-tat-tat.

What do you think they are chatting about?

Where do you think the cool cat might be sitting?

What other animals did you see on the walk?

When I finished my walk, I sat for a chat with cool Mr Cat, who sang rat-a-tat-tat.



About this project

This Story Walk has been developed as a part of a broader project called ‘Knowing your Place 3219 Whittington Walks Project’.

The City facilitates and provides local community groups, schools and residents with an opportunity to participate in a wide range of community based projects. The students who have participated in this Story Walk project are currently working toward their Foundation level of the Victorian Certificate of
Applied Learning (VCAL).

Working directly with a City project officer, VCAL students from Nelson Park assisted in identifying a route, researching the area
and developing a Story Walk.

The Walk combines the pleasures of reading aloud with all of the joys and benefits of walking as a
group together outdoors.

“We believe that creating something for our community helps us to be contributing community members. Being a good citizen is important for creating a sense of belonging and identity within the community.”


Learning outcomes

The students were required to conduct a walk audit to assess the walkability of the route.

The learning outcomes for the students have been:

  • skill development in mapping, auditing, presenting
  • literacy development - writing for an audience
  • enhanced problem solving, planning and team skills
  • cultivation of community connections between various organisations
  • increased understanding of concepts of place, walk ability and livability
  • opportunity to build career experiences
  • increased communication skills and ability
  • increased physical activity.

The City of Greater Geelong wishes to acknowledge the efforts of Rebecca Kerr and Matt Bonollo, teachers and all the students from Nelson Park School who participated in this project.


About Nelson Park School

We are year 10 VCAL students at Nelson Park School. Our school understands that students learn in many different ways and we believe that adults contribute to the community in many different ways too.

Creating something for families in our community has helped us understand that we can make the environment a happier place for others and ourselves.

We believe that all children have the right to play, imagine and create. We hope that through our story walk, parents, carers and children will enjoy playing with the idea of storytelling and make it a regular part of their family life.

The potential benefits of this Community Story Walk:

  • children and parents/ carers having fun together
  • children and parents/ carers learning to better communicate
  • children and parents/ carers get out and about together – good for mind and body health
  • children and parents/ carers building better relationships
  • community wanting to use the area
  • community taking pride in the area.





Page last updated: Monday, 23 December 2019

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