There are 34,169 registered dogs within the City of Greater Geelong.
There are 34,169 registered dogs within the City of Greater Geelong.

Creating safe and enjoyable spaces for everyone including those with four legs!

Tuesday, 29 May 2018

The City is reviewing its Dogs in Public Places Policy and developing a Dog Park Strategy - and wants the community to have their say.

Geelong has a growing population, and it’s important to plan, design and deliver public open spaces for people to exercise including those who are accompanied by their dog!

There are 34,169 registered dogs within the City of Greater Geelong, with the highest levels of dog registration in Lara, Highton/Wandana Heights and Ocean Grove.

Greater Geelong is comprised of 1,250 square kilometres of land, including a mix of coastal, rural and urban areas, consisting of parks, reserves, walking, tracks, pathways, coastline reserves, and other open spaces. The City enforces dog control orders to protect people, animals and the natural environment.

As part of the community consultation, people can provide feedback on existing City-managed dog control orders as well as Bellarine Bayside Foreshore Committee’s draft dog control orders.

Dog controls for the coastline from Collendina on the eastern boundary of Ocean Grove through to Thirteenth Beach, including parts of Ocean Grove, Barwon Heads and Black Rock are managed by the Barwon Coast Committee of Management and are not part of this engagement. The community will be engaged at a later date about these control orders.

The City previously received community feedback on dog regulations, during consultation on the Domestic Animal Management Plan late last year, and is now building on this feedback by asking people specific questions about where they walk and whether the dog control regulations (for example on-lead, off-lead) are working and whether any improvements can be made.

The City is also very interested to hear people’s views about fenced dog parks. The City has one fenced dog park in Stead Park, Corio, where dogs can be exercised off-lead, play and socialise with other dogs in a secure environment. With increasing population (human and four-legged!), the City is planning to create more fenced dog parks across the municipality. Community feedback on whether these are effective, whether there are drawbacks or suggestions about where they should be built is now sought.

If people would like to get involved and tell us what they think about dog controls in their area or about fenced dog parks, they can complete the online survey until 25 June 2018.

Hard copies are also available at the City’s Customer Service Centres or by phoning 5272 5272.

The following drop in sessions for providing face-to-face feedback will also be held:

• Monday 4 June 1.30pm-3.30pm Portarlington Senior Citizens Hall Newcombe Street, Portarlington
• Monday 4 June 7.00pm-9.00pm South Barwon Civic Centre 2 Colac Road, Belmont
• Wednesday 6 June 7.00pm-9.00pm Corio Leisuretime Centre 262-268 Anakie Rd, Norlane
• Thursday 7 June 5.30pm-7.30pm Virginia Todd Hall 9-11 Clarence Street, Geelong West

Linda Quinn - Director Community Life:


We invite everyone to have a say about our walking trails and open spaces where dogs are exercised. We want to hear from people with dogs and people without as it is important that these spaces are safe and appealing for everyone to enjoy.

There are 14 dogs for every 100 people in the City of Greater Geelong so we need to talk about how we can provide great spaces for dog lovers to enjoy with their animals without detracting from the rights of other people who wish to exercise and enjoy our beautiful public spaces.

With research showing that pets can help to improve people’s mental and physical health, reduce the effects of stress, reduce social isolation and build a sense of community and inclusion, four-legged friends are an important part of community life.

Fun Facts

• Dogs are Australia’s most popular pet: 38 per cent of households own a dog.
• It is estimated that there are 4.8 million pet dogs in Australia.