Positive and respectful relationships

Respectful and supportive relationships contribute to positive health outcomes and help you feel happy and satisfied.

Unexpected changes like illness, disability, unemployment or living apart can challenge our relationships but there are many ways that we can support each other practically and emotionally.

 

The art of giving 

Being generous towards others and your own personal happiness are entwined. We’ve created a card that you can print, personalise, and drop in a letterbox. Offer your time to support a neighbour in whichever way may be helpful.

 

Safe at Home

The 'Safe at Home' toolkit is a free online resource that includes information and advice for people experiencing family violence. There is content specifically curated for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, people living with disability, LGBTQIA+ people, and culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

 

Building healthy relationships

Positive and respectful relationships are fundamental to physical and mental health and wellbeing, but your relationships with partners and family members who live with you with can have the most powerful effects.

 

Strengthening relationships after job loss

If you’ve just lost your job, or had your hours reduced, you may be experiencing financial difficulties for the first time. Now is the time to lean on the people who care about you for support.

 

Alcohol - keeping some perspective

For most adults, drinking a small amount of alcohol is not harmful.  However, excessive drinking may have a detrimental effect on a persons’ health and wellbeing as well as on family relationships.

 

Family rituals

Most of us have unique family rituals that teach us important life lessons. If you haven’t created any rituals for your family or would like to include some new ones, here are some ideas and inspiration.

 

What's your family story?

Supportive family relationships can make you feel safe and loved. This activity encourages children to get to know themselves by creating a family story with older relatives.

 

Storytime with the Geelong Cats

Read along to inclusive stories with your favourite Geelong Cats players!

AFLW player, Anna Teague, reads 'Some Girls' a book by Nelly Thomas with illustrations by Sarah Dunk. This beautiful and funny book inspires all girls to be free of stereotypes and encourages kids – and adults – to allow them to be.





Page last updated: Wednesday, 12 August 2020

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