Developing your event Risk Assessment

A risk management plan is a document that identifies and specifies an approach required to manage risks associated with your event.

There are three key steps in developing a risk assessment. Identify the risks, assess them to minimise an injury resulting from your event.

The Events Unit have developed a risk assessment template to assist you through this process or you can create your own.


1. Find it - identify the risks

List all of the hazards or possible situations associated with the event activity that may expose people to injury, illness or disease.

List these hazards in the ‘hazards’ column of your risk assessment template.

Use experts or experienced people to advise you on your risk assessment.


2. Assess it - how will you manage the risks?

Rate or assess what the ‘likelihood’ is of people being exposed to the hazard and what the ‘consequences’ could be as a result of the hazard occurring.

Use the Risk Ranking Matrix in the template.


3. Fix it - how will you resolve the issues?

Identify what practical measures could be put in place to eliminate or reduce the likelihood of the hazard occurring. This is where changes are made to the event to reduce the risks.

Use the hierarchy of control system to minimise or eliminate exposure to hazards. It is a widely accepted system promoted by numerous safety organisations.

Use the Hierarchy of Control table to guide you as to what type of controls you could put in place to manage the hazards once you have assessed their risk level.


In a risk assessment template this formula is shown in a risk ranking matrix.

Likelihood
Risk Ranking Table
High
5
10
15
20
25
Significant
4
8
12
16
20
Moderate
3
6
6
12
15
Low
2
4
6
8
10
Negligible
1
2
3
4
5
Consequence
Negligible
Low
Moderate
Major
Catastrophic

What is the likelihood of a risk occurring at your event? Use the table below to determine how likely the risk might be.

Table: Likelihood definitions
A high likelihood
  • It is expected to occur in most circumstances
  • There is a strong likelihood of the hazards reoccurring
A significant likelihood
  • Similar hazards have been recorded on a regular basis
  • Considered that it is likely that the hazard could occur
A moderate likelihood
  • Incidents or hazards have occurred infrequently in the past
A low likelihood
  • Very few known incidents of occurrence
  • Has not occurred yet, but it could occur sometime
A negligible likelihood
  • No known or recorded incidents of occurrence
  • Remote chance, may only occur in exceptional circumstance

The following table helps explain the definitions of consequence, to help you plan for risks associated with your event.

Table: Consequence defitinitions
Catastrophic
  • Multiple or single death.
  • Numerous injuries
  • International and National Media outrage
  • Brand reputation damage
Major
  • Serious health impacts on multiple or single persons or permanent disability.
  • National media outrage
  • Brand reputation damage
Moderate
  • Rehabilitation requirements for injured persons.
  • Local media and community concern
Low
  • Injury to person resulting in lost time and claims.
  • Minor isolated concerns raised by stakeholders, customers
Negligible
  • Persons requiring first aid
  • Minimum impact to reputation

How to control hazards

By determining the consequences and likelihood of risks occurring, you can now, aim to eliminate, minimise and control the hazards.

Use the hierarchy of control system to minimise or eliminate exposure to hazards.

It is a widely accepted system promoted by numerous safety organisations. Referring to the hierarchy will help you decide what controls to put in place to manage the hazards once you have assessed their risk level.

Table: Heirachy of controls
Elimination
Eliminate the hazard
Remove or stop the hazard if possible, remove the cause or source of the hazard, by eliminating the machine, task or work process.
If this is not practical, then substitute.
Substitution
Substitute the process
Use a less hazardous process- use a less-noisy machine for the task, or introduce a less-noisy work process.
If this is not practical, then engineer.
Engineering
Change the equipment
Introduce enclosures and barriers around or between the hazard . Improve maintenance procedures.
Isolation
Isolate the issue
Separate or isolate the hazard or equipment from people by relocation or by changing the operation.
Administrative
Give appropriate direction
Design and communicate written or verbal procedures that prevent the hazard from occurring.
If this is not practical, then use PPE.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Provide protective equipment and or clothing
Provide protective equipment appropriate to the risk. Provide training information and supervision to ensure that personal hearing protection is fitted, used and maintained appropriately. Equipment that protects the person exposed to the hazard.

Once the Risk Assessment has been conducted, a Risk Management Plan can then be developed.


What is a Risk Management Plan?

The risk management plan should be based upon the risk assessment.


The Australian New Zealand Risk Management – Principals and Guidelines

There is a new standard for managing risks that supersedes the Australian/New Zealand Standards 4360:2004. The new standard AS/NZ ISO 31000:2009 is available online.

The new standard defines the logical processes of risk management and provides the principles and guidelines for managing any form of risk in a systematic, transparent and credible manner.





Page last updated: Thursday, 2 May 2019

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