Council Minutes - Section B: Reports - 11 June 2019

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Reports tabled at the Community Focus Council Meeting of Council on Tuesday 11 June 2019, held at the Northern Bay Colledge, 1 Wexford Court, Corio.


  1. Draft Lara Recreation Reserve Masterplan

  2. Corio Play Space

  3. Amendment C359 Part 2 Scarlett Street, Geelong West – Consideration of Panel Report and Adoption

  4. Revocation of Flood-Prone Area Designation of New Lots at Lifestyle Village 123 – 163 Boundary Road, Mount Duneed

  5. Revocation of Flood-Prone Area Designation of New Lots at Fyansford West Estate Stages 1.1 and 1.2

  6. Planning Authorisations – Council to Staff

  7. Live Streaming and Publishing Recordings of Council Meetings Update



Councillor Grzybek declared a direct interest in Agenda Item 1, Draft Lara Recreation Reserve Masterplan, in that she is Secretary of the Lara United Football Club, and left the meeting room prior to discussion at 7:50pm.


1. Draft Lara Recreation Reserve Masterplan

Source:

Community Life – Social Planning & Investment

Director:

Robyn Stevens

Portfolio:

Social and Infrastructure Planning


Purpose

  1. To seek Council endorsement to release the draft Lara Recreation Reserve Master Plan for a six week community consultation period.


Background

  1. Lara Recreation Reserve is located in the heart of the town and enjoys a mix of active and passive use. Tenanting clubs include the Lara Sporting Club, Lara Netball Club, Lara Football Club, Lara United Football (Soccer) Club, Lara Cricket Club, Lara Baseball Club, Lara Tennis Club, Lara Bowls Club, 1st Lara Scouts and St Johns Ambulance. It is also bordered by Lara Secondary College and neighbour to Lara Primary School.

  2. Lara Recreation Reserve is an expansive 18 hectare site which plays host to over 1,500 sporting club participants. It is a highly valued space that is well regarded and utilised by the community. In April 2019, an initial community survey indicated that 88% of respondents visit the reserve regularly.

  3. The City allocated funding in the 2018-19 budget for a master plan to better understand community needs and aspirations, and to make recommendations for improving the reserve over the medium to long term.

  4. The draft master plan has been guided by the Project Reference Group, comprising representatives of all tenanting user groups of the reserve.


Key Matters

  1. The draft Lara Recreation Reserve Master Plan (Attachment 2) has been developed through extensive community consultation, research and analysis.

  2. The draft master plan identifies opportunities and improvements to enhance community use through improvements to social infrastructure on the reserve.

  3. The preliminary cost estimates to deliver the proposed draft master plan are in the vicinity of $10-12 million, plus any cost of escalation over time. The final master plan will consider options for a staged delivery.

  4. It is proposed that the draft master plan be released for broader consultation, to test its principles and draft recommendations and to assist in developing the final master plan for Council endorsement.

  5. Further funding for detailed design will be required for each improvement identified in the draft masterplan that will also provide a more robust understanding of cost, scope and timelines for delivery. There are currently no funds allocated for detailed design.

Councillor Aitken moved, Councillor Kontelj seconded -

  1. That Council approve the release of the draft Lara Recreation Reserve Master Plan (Attachment 2 of this report) for the purpose of broader community consultation for a period of six weeks.

Councillor Nelson left the meeting room at 7:54pm

Councillor Nelson re-entered the meeting room at 7:56pm

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. While there are no immediate financial implications, preliminary cost estimates indicate that to deliver the draft master plan will be in the vicinity of $10-$12 million over the lifespan of the plan. The delivery of infrastructure items will need to be via a partnership model with state and federal government, peak sporting bodies, local sporting clubs and the City.

  2. Further funding for detailed design will be required to gain a more robust understanding of cost and timelines for delivery. There are currently no funds allocated for detailed design.


Community Engagement

  1. To guide the development of the Lara Recreation Reserve Master Plan and its engagement activities, a Project Control Group and Project Reference Group were established with representatives from the City and from tenanting user groups.

  2. In March 2019 an initial consultation survey was conducted which aimed to understand the demographics and needs profile of people who visit the reserve. These insights have informed the development of the draft master plan.

  3. The survey was distributed via letterbox drop to residences within a 400m radius of the reserve, with 480 homes contacted. In addition, the survey was circulated to all tenanting clubs for distribution to their membership. The survey was advertised on the City’s Facebook page which reached 2,600 people, had 140 post engagements and was shared 28 times. At the conclusion of the consultation period on 2 April, 2019, 335 surveys were completed and 28 were partially completed.

  4. A summary from the community consultation is provided in Attachment 3. The main reasons respondents visit the reserve are to play sport, exercise, walk the dog or to simply get some fresh air. Respondents’ favourite attributes of the reserve include the trees and grassed areas and sporting facilities. Key areas identified as requiring improvement include parking, public toilets, sporting clubroom facilities, sports lighting, the provision of path networks and improved open space areas.

  5. Following the release of the draft master plan for the six week engagement period, the next phase will involve providing another opportunity for local residents and stakeholders to have their say. This will include:

    1. reconnecting with the residents within 400m of the reserve, requesting that they now provide feedback on the draft master plan via the City’s Have Your Say online platform;

    2. requesting that tenanting clubs distribute the draft master plan throughout their respective membership bases for any further feedback;

    3. advertising the engagement on the City’s Facebook page; and

    4. advertising and publishing of the draft plan on geelongaustralia.com.au (hard copies available on request).


Social Equity Considerations

  1. Lara Recreation Reserve is home to a strong female participant base, with approximately 550 women participating in the numerous sport and recreation clubs based at the reserve. All clubs have a strong focus on inclusion and the provision of facilities to support participation growth will create greater opportunities for women.

  2. The Issues & Opportunities Paper (Attachment 4) identified a range of improvements that will enhance the reserve to improve social equity. This includes better accessibility through enhanced pedestrian connections and movement, potential development of a walking circuit, and improved gender equity through the provision of female friendly facilities.

  3. The draft Lara Recreation Reserve Master Plan also aims to address inequity in facility provision through the development of improved sport and recreation facilities to meet standard specifications, and additional better quality passive open space areas.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The draft Master Plan is consistent with Council policy and approach to sporting reserve renewal and facility development.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. The draft Lara Recreation Reserve Master Plan aligns with the following priorities in the Council Plan:

    1. Informed social infrastructure and planning – the draft master plan is based on extensive consultation and will provide more quality active and passive recreational spaces for the Lara community.

    2. A more inclusive and diverse community through the provision of infrastructure that supports social connections within our community. This extends to the provision of accessible and welcoming facilities for people of all genders and abilities.

    3. Improved health and safety for our community by enhancing the safety and user satisfaction of social infrastructure, which in turn provides greater participation opportunities and health benefits.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No City officers or contractors who have provided advice in relation to this report have declared a conflict of interest regarding the matter under consideration.


Risk Assessment

  1. The City can progress the master planning process but there is a risk that there will not be adequate funding to implement the plan.


Environmental Implications

  1. The draft Lara Recreation Reserve Master Plan proposes to improve the quantity and quality of open space, while reducing any loss of vegetation in the reserve. Environmentally sustainable design opportunities will be further explored in the detailed design phase for any new and upgraded facilities and lighting.

Councillor Grzybek re-entered the meeting room at 8:04pm


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2. Corio Play Space

Source:

Community Life – Social Planning and Investment

Director:

Robyn Stevens

Portfolio:

Social and Infrastructure Planning


Purpose

  1. To seek Council’s approval to progress with design and construction of a local play space at the Purnell Road Community Centre site and a district nature-based play space at Goldsworthy Reserve.


Background

  1. At the Council meeting on 26 June 2018, in relation to the new Corio (Purnell Road) Integrated Child and Family Centre (CICFC), Council resolved to ‘undertake design work for a new sensory play space on the site of the former Corio City Learning and Care and that the design be undertaken in consultation with the local community and be presented back to Council as part of the 2019-20 Budget process’.

  2. The proposal to develop a sensory play space at the Corio City Learning and Care (CLAC) site originated in response to community concerns about the loss of open space associated with the Purnell Road CICFC development.


Key Matters

  1. Following an assessment of the CLAC site, it has been deemed unsuitable for a sensory play space due to the limited size, poor access and parking facilities, and its location close to a main road and associated risks for children.

  2. The immediate precinct is relatively well serviced for local playgrounds, however the City of Greater Geelong Play Strategy 2010 identifies a need and opportunity for a district level play space to be considered at Goldsworthy Reserve.

  3. It is proposed that a local play space be developed in conjunction with the new CICFC, that further investigation and detailed design be undertaken in consultation with the community for a sensory/district level play space at nearby Goldsworthy Reserve and that the CLAC site, once completely vacated, be considered for sale (Attachment 2).

  4. The costs associated with construction of a new local play space at CICFC and the design and development of a potential new district level sensory play space at Goldsworthy Reserve, are included in the 2019-20 draft budget.

Councillor Grzybek moved, Councillor Aitken seconded -

  1. That Council:

    1. Note the proposal to include a local play space within the public open space of the new Corio (Purnell Road) Integrated Child and Family Centre;

    2. Authorise officers to commence design of a district nature-based play space at Goldsworthy Reserve in consultation with the community; and

    3. Note the intention to sell the site of the Corio City Learning and Care following its closure.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. The proposed play space developments can be delivered within existing budgets.

  2. The recently constructed play space at Gateway Sanctuary in Leopold has been referenced as a benchmark for the proposed new sensory play development in Corio. The Gateway development was completed in 2017-18 at a cost of $300,000. A comparable play offering can be designed and constructed at the Goldsworthy Reserve within the existing CLAC play space budget of $350,000.

  3. It is proposed to reallocate the budget of $350,000 currently identified in the 2019-20 draft budget for development of a play space at the CLAC site, toward development of a new sensory play space at Goldsworthy Reserve.

  4. A local play space at the Purnell Road CFIFC site is estimated to cost $50,000. This can be delivered within the existing CFIFC capital budget.

  5. Following its closure, the site of the CLAC be sold as it is not well suited for development as public open space.

  6. The construction of a sensory play space will create additional ongoing maintenance costs estimated at approximately $10,000 per annum.


Community Engagement

  1. In September 2017 the City initiated the ‘Approval Procedure for Open Space Developments Projects Policy’, which provided an opportunity for the community to make submissions in regard to the proposed development of the CICFC on public open space.

  2. A submission (petition) received from the Corio Kindergarten on 28 September 2017 identified loss of open space as a key issue associated with the development.

  3. A Submissions Review Panel was held on 2 May 2018 . At this hearing, the Panel noted the following in relation to the loss of open space “that implementation of an all ages sensory open space will be investigated as per example at Gateway Sanctuary Leopold rather than a traditional playground”.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. An all ages sensory play space is a specialised play offering which will attract higher visitation numbers and longer stays than is typical of a local playground. Such a development would be considered a district level provision which typically create demand for supporting infrastructure such as off street car parking, barbecues, shelters and public toilets.

  2. The development of a sensory or nature based playground may be likely to attract children and families with sensory needs. There may be an increased likelihood of ‘runners’ - this creates a high risk if near a busy road and would require the playground to be fully fenced, which is undesirable and doesn’t guarantee safety as the City cannot ensure gates won’t be left open by others.

  3. Goldsworthy Reserve is approximately 400m from the CLAC site and is identified within the Geelong Play Strategy as being a suitable site for the development of a District playground. This is a large site incorporating 2.5 hectares of public open space within a larger 6 hectares reserve with an athletics track and supporting infrastructure including public toilets and off street parking.

  4. Goldsworthy Reserve is ideally sited to fill an identified gap in play provision in Corio and is the preferred site for a district level sensory or nature based play space for this community.

  5. A local play space could be delivered at the Purnell Road CFIFC site. While this site is still smaller than the recommended provision standards, the public open space at this site is significantly larger than the CLAC site and it is not located directly across from the shopping centre.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The proposal in this report is consistent with Council Play Strategy 2010.

  2. All play spaces will be designed and constructed in accordance with Australian Standards.

  3. The City’s standards for provision of public open space as set out in the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme and the Sustainable Communities Infrastructure Development Guidelines, recommend that local parks be a minimum of 1 hectare and district parks be a minimum of 2 hectares.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. The proposal in this report is consistent with Council Plan strategic priorities for:

    1. Informed Social Infrastructure and Planning, specifically in providing more quality open space that supports active lifestyles; and

    2. A more inclusive and diverse community, specifically through the proposed development of a sensory play space for people of all abilities.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No City officer involved in the development of this report has a direct or indirect interest in this matter.


Risk Assessment

  1. The CLAC site is 0.23 hectares and due to its relatively small size and location adjacent to a busy road and shopping centre, is considered unsuitable for development as open space. The proximity to the road and destination shopping centre creates public safety risks.


Environmental Implications

  1. The proposed play space at Goldsworthy Reserve will be developed consistent with nature play principles.


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3. Amendment C359 Part 2 - 9 Scarlett Street, Geelong West – Adoption of amendment

Source:

Planning, Design & Development – Strategic Implementation

Director:

Gareth Smith

Portfolio:

Sustainable Development


Purpose

  1. To adopt Amendment C359 Part 2 applying to 9 Scarlett Street Geelong West.


Background

  1. Amendment C359 (Amendment) made changes to several heritage overlays across the municipality. Amendment C359 Part 1 was adopted on 10 July 2018 and came into operation on 6 December 2018.

  2. Adoption of the proposed deletion of the heritage overlay from 9 Scarlett Street, Geelong West (The Former Donaghy’s Rope Walk Building) was deferred as the Independent Panel concluded it necessary for Heritage Victoria to first amend the extent of its Registration in the Victorian Heritage Register.

  3. Council on 10 July 2018 resolved to defer adoption of Amendment C359 Part 2 (solely the heritage overlay removal from 9 Scarlett Street) until Heritage Victoria considered changing the extent of its registration for the Former Ropeworks site.

  4. 9 Scarlett Street Geelong West is owned by a developer and has planning approval for subdivision and residential development.


Key Matters

  1. The Former Donaghy’s Rope Walk Building (Part) and Rope-Making Machinery is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register as a site of state significance and is also included in the heritage overlay in the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme.

  2. Following an emergency building order in 2017, the former rope walk building (a long narrow shed) was demolished. The demolition eroded the heritage fabric of the site and both the registration and the heritage overlay needed to be amended to reflect this change. Amendment C359 sought to amend the extent of the heritage overlay HO741.

  3. Heritage Victoria has subsequently changed the registration of the Former Donaghy’s Rope Walk which means Council can now adopt Amendment C359 Part 2.

Councillor Mason moved, Councillor Asher seconded -

  1. That Council:

    1. Adopt Amendment C359 Part 2 in the form outlined in Attachment 4 of this report; and

    2. Submit the adopted Amendment C359 Part 2 together with the prescribed information to the Minister for Planning requesting approval.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. There are no financial implications arising from this recommendation. The amendment approval fee is to be paid by the proponent.


Community Engagement

  1. The Amendment was exhibited from 31 August 2017 to 2 October 2017 in accordance with the requirements of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. An Independent Panel considered submissions about the Amendment. Submitters were notified of the release of the Independent Panel Report and Council’s adoption of Amendment C359 Part 1 and the final decision of the Minister for Planning.

  2. Heritage Victoria exhibited the proposed changes to the VHR Registration and Council made a submission generally supporting the changes and seeking additional detail on registered objects to be included in the registration.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. Amendment C359 Part 2 does not raise any social equity issues.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. Amendment C359 Part 2 will achieve the objectives of the local planning policy framework to conserve and enhance individual places of post contact cultural heritage significance. It will also align the extent of the heritage overlay in the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme with the extent of the registration of the former rope walk building on the Victorian Heritage Register. This complies with the Planning Practice Note on Applying the Heritage Overlay and the Heritage Act 2017.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. Amendment C359 Part 2 supports the sustainable built and natural environment strategic direction of Council Plan and is consistent with the strategic direction of community wellbeing and the priority of connected, creative and strong communities.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No City officers involved in the preparation of the report have a direct or indirect interest in the issue to which this report relates.


Risk Assessment

  1. There are no notable risks associated with implementing the recommendation contained in this report.


Environmental Implications

  1. There are no environmental implications arising from adoption of Amendment C359 Part 2.


Attachment 2

Background

  1. The former ropeworks and ropewalk at 95-103 Pakington Street and 9 Scarlett Street, Geelong West was included on the Victorian Heritage Register as Number H1169 on 29 August 1996. The site was included in Heritage Overlay HO741 in the Planning Scheme in July 2000.

  2. An emergency building order issued by Council resulted in the demolition of the former rope walk building in 2017. No approval from Heritage Victoria was required for its removal under a permit exemption granted on 10 November 2015.

  3. An amendment request was lodged with Council in 2017 to remove the heritage overlay from the land at 9 Scarlett Street Geelong West on the basis that the structure had been removed and no heritage significance remained. The request submitted that Heritage Victoria had confirmed that no further approvals would be required as on-site structures had been removed and they would instigate a process to remove the site from the Victorian Heritage Registry.

  4. Unfortunately Heritage Victoria did not advance this prior to the exhibition of Amendment C359 and the subsequent Independent Panel Hearing.

  5. The Independent Panel appointed to consider the submissions about Amendment C359 concluded that 9 Scarlett Street Geelong West should not be removed from the Heritage Overlay as it is still on the Victorian Heritage Register and its removal while it is on the Register is contrary to the Planning Practice Note Applying the Heritage Overlay and the Heritage Act 2017. Its inclusion in the Victorian Heritage Register should be considered first.

  6. Council accepted this Independent Panel recommendation and deferred consideration of this item into Amendment C359 Part 2.


Change to the Heritage Victoria Registration

  1. Tract Consultants lodged a nomination with Heritage Victoria to amend the extent of VHR H1169 to remove 9 Scarlett Street Geelong west. The City provided Tract a letter of support.

  2. Heritage Victoria recommended amending the registration by removing some land, listing objects at the place, changing the name of the registration and by revising the Statement of Cultural Heritage Significance.

  3. In response to public notification of this recommendation, the City made a submission supporting the proposal but requesting more detail be included about the objects of significance and into the statement of cultural significance.

  4. The Heritage Council considered the proposed registration changes and Council’s submission and accepted the deletion of the land at 9 Scarlett Street Geelong West as the fabric of significance to the State of Victoria is no longer retained.

  5. On 18 April 2019, the Heritage Council determined to amend item VHR H1169 in the Victorian Heritage Register by reducing the registered extent of the Place and including registered objects integral to the Place.

  6. The way is now clear for Council to adopt the change to the delete HO741 from 9 Scarlett Street Geelong West.


Attachment 3

Planning and Environment Act 1987

GREATER GEELONG PLANNING SCHEME
AMENDMENT C359 Part 2
INSTRUCTION SHEET

The planning authority for this amendment is the City of Greater Geelong.

The Greater Geelong Planning Scheme is amended as follows:

Planning Scheme Maps

The Planning Scheme Maps are amended by a total of 1 attached map sheet.

Overlay Maps

  1. Amend Planning Scheme Map No. 37HO in the manner shown on the attached map marked “Greater Geelong Planning Scheme, Amendment C359 part 2”.

End of document

Greater Geelong Planning Scheme - Local Provision - Amendment C359 part 2

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4. Revocation of Flood-Prone Area Designation of New Lots at Lifestyle Village 123 – 163 Boundary Road, Mount Duneed

Source:

City Services – Engineering Services

Executive Manager:

Guy Wilson-Browne

Portfolio:

Social and Infrastructure PlanningSocial and Infrastructure Planning


Purpose

  1. To consider revoking Council’s designation of 12 December 2006 of flood affected land Lifestyle Village, Mount Duneed as liable to flooding pursuant to regulation 153 of the Building Regulations 2018.


Background

  1. Council has a statutory obligation under the Building Regulations 2018 to designate land as liable to flooding where it reasonably knows it to be prone to flooding. Conversely, there is an obligation to remove the encumbrance of designation from land that is no longer considered to be flood-prone.

  2. The current designated flood mapping (Attachment 2) was designated by Council at its meeting of 12 December 2006.

  3. This revocation will result in new lots in Lifestyle Village fronting 123 – 163 Boundary Road, Mount Duneed being free of their flood prone status, paving the way for owners to build homes on their land.


Key Issues

  1. The flood mapping is subject to a revision due to the subdivision and development at 123 – 163 Boundary Road, Mount Duneed. Prior to subdivision the parent lot was considered to be liable to flooding. This development site, which is also known as Lifestyle Village, Mount Duneed, achieves flood immunity for newly created lots for flood events up to and including the 100 year Average Recurrence Interval (ARI) event due to approved internal earthworks.

  2. The decision by Council engineers that the flood prone status can be removed includes assessment of internal drainage, road construction and earthworks to contain potential floodwaters from the 100 year ARI event within road and drainage reserves
    (Attachment 3).

  3. It should be noted that designation is separate to the creation of flood overlays within the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme, which generally follows designation. In the case of this development, a planning scheme amendment to create post-development flood zones or overlays is proposed after the design of the proposed precincts.

Councillor Murnane moved, Councillor Nelson seconded -

  1. That Council revoke the Council designation of 12 December 2006 of flood affected land Lifestyle Village, Mount Duneed as liable to flooding pursuant to regulation 153 of the Building Regulations 2018.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. No impact to budget.


Community Engagement

  1. A revocation of designation does not warrant public consultation as it constitutes the removal of an encumbrance on land.

  2. Relevant City databases and flood maps will be revised and updates sent to the Corangamite Catchment Management Authority and Building Control Commission.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. The City has a responsibility to the community to provide the best possible information on areas that are flood prone. The removal of flood prone designation allows owners to build on their land without a special permit from the City, and without raising the floor level of their home. It also reduces the cost of property insurance.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The City has various statutory responsibilities for drainage management and flood management (prevention, response and recovery) as set out in the Local Government Act 1989, Local Government Regulations 1990, Planning and Environment Act 1987, Building Regulations 2018, Water Act 1989, Subdivision Act 1988 and Emergency Management Act 1986.

  2. The works have resulted in the lots being protected from flooding during a major storm event that has a one per cent probability of occurring in any one year, and occurs on average once in 100 years. This is the required standard for new subdivisions.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. The recommendations of this report are consistent with the Council Plan, in relation to planned sustainable development.


Conflict of Interest

  1. There are no officer direct or indirect interests with respect to this report.


Risk Assessment

  1. Council also has some risk exposure with any failure to disclose the flood-prone status of a property in a land information certificate.

  2. The revocation of the designation is the final step in minimising the City’s risk.


Environmental Implications

  1. The revocation of flood-prone areas designation and designation of revised flood data through the design of this stage is considered unlikely to result in any known adverse environmental impacts.


Attachment 2 - Current Flood Map

Current flood map

Attachment 3 - Revised Flood Map

Revised flood map

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5. Revocation of Flood-Prone Area Designation of New Lots at Fyansford West Estate Stages 1.1 and 1.2

Source:

City Services – Engineering Services

Director:

Guy Wilson- Browne

Portfolio:

Social and Infrastructure Planning


Purpose

  1. To consider revoking Council’s designation of 23 August 2011 of flood affected land Fyansford West Estate Stages 1.1 and 1.2 as liable to flooding pursuant to regulation 153 of the Building Regulations 2018.


Background

  1. Council has a statutory obligation under the Building Regulations 2018 to designate land as liable to flooding where it reasonably knows it to be prone to flooding. Conversely, there is an obligation to remove the encumbrance of designation from land that is no longer considered to be flood-prone.

  2. The current designated flood mapping (Attachment 2) was designated by Council at its meeting of 23 August 2011.

  3. This revocation will result in another stage of new lots in Fyansford West Estate fronting 100 – 150 Hamilton Highway, Fyansford being free of their flood prone status, paving the way for owners to build homes on their land.


Key Issues

  1. The flood mapping is subject to a revision due to the subdivision and development at 100 – 150 Hamilton Highway, Fyansford. Prior to subdivision the parent lot was considered to be liable to flooding. This development site, which is also known as Fyansford West Estate, Stages 1.1 and 1.2, achieves flood immunity for newly created lots for flood events up to and including the 100 year Average Recurrence Interval (ARI) event due to approved internal earthworks.

  2. The decision by Council engineers that the flood prone status can be removed includes assessment of internal drainage, road construction and earthworks to contain potential floodwaters from the 100 year ARI event within road and drainage reserves
    (Attachment 3).

  3. It should be noted that designation is separate to the creation of flood overlays within the Planning Scheme, which generally follows designation. In the case of this development, the planning scheme amendment to create post-development flood zones or overlays is proposed after the design of the proposed precincts.

Councillor Kontelj moved, Councillor Mansfield seconded -

  1. That Council revoke the Council designation of 23 August 2011 of flood affected land Fyansford West Estate, Stage 1.1 and 1.2 as liable to flooding pursuant to regulation 153 of the Building Regulations 2018.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. No impact to budget.


Community Engagement

  1. A revocation of designation does not warrant public consultation as it constitutes the removal of an encumbrance on land.

  2. Relevant Council databases and flood maps will be revised and updates sent to the Corangamite Catchment Management Authority and Building Control Commission.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. Council have a responsibility to the community to provide the best possible information on areas that are flood prone. The removal of flood prone designation allows owners to build on their land without a special permit from the City, and without raising the floor level of their home. It also reduces the cost of property insurance.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The City has various statutory responsibilities for drainage management and flood management (prevention, response and recovery) as set out in the Local Government Act 1989, Local Government Regulations 1990, Planning and Environment Act 1987, Building Regulations 2018, Water Act 1989, Subdivision Act 1988 and Emergency Management Act 1986.

  2. The works have resulted in the lots being protected from flooding during a major storm event that has a one per cent probability of occurring in any one year, and occurs on average once in 100 years. This is the required standard for new subdivisions.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. The recommendations of this report are consistent with Council Plan, in relation to planned sustainable development.


Conflict of Interest

  1. There are no officer direct or indirect interests with respect to this report.


Risk Assessment

  1. Council also has some risk exposure with any failure to disclose the flood-prone status of a property in a Land Information Certificate.

  2. The revocation of the designation is the final step in minimising Council’s risk.


Environmental Implications

  1. The revocation of flood-prone areas designation and designation of revised flood data through the design of this stage is considered unlikely to result in any known adverse environmental impacts.


Attachment 2 - Current Flood Map

Current Flood Map

Attachment 3 - Revised Flood Map

Revised Flood Map

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6. Planning Authorisations – Council to Staff

Source:

Planning, Design & Development – City Development 

Director:

Gareth Smith

Portfolio:

Sustainable Development


Purpose

  1. To appoint City officers as authorised officers under the Planning and Environment Act 1987 (P&EA).


Background

  1. City officers are appointed as authorised officers to exercise statutory powers under various Acts and regulations. Appointments as authorised officers are to individual staff members.

  2. The P&EA regulates enforcement and is reliant on authorised officers acting on behalf of the responsible authority (Council).


Key Matters

  1. Where there is a specific power within an Act, Council should appoint authorised officers pursuant to that Act. This is the case for the P&EA.

  2. Planning staff members have recently been employed by the City and are required to be authorised under the P&EA.

  3. Attachment 2 sets out the Instrument of Appointment and Authorisation under the P&EA and lists the staff members to whom this authorisation applies (instrument).

Councillor Mason moved, Councillor Asher seconded -

  1. In the exercise of the powers conferred by section 224 of the Local Government Act 1989 and the other legislation referred to in the Greater Geelong City Council Instrument of Appointment & Authorisation - Planning & Environment Act 1987 only (instrument) (Attachment 2), Greater Geelong City Council (Council) resolves that the:

    1. Members of City staff referred to in the instrument be appointed and authorised as set out in the instrument;

    2. Instrument comes into force immediately upon the common seal of Council being affixed to the instrument, and remains in force until Council determines to vary or revoke it;

    3. Instrument be sealed.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. There are no financial implications arising from the subject of this report.


Community Engagement

  1. Relevant City managers have been consulted regarding this recommended appointment and authorisation.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. There are no social equity implications arising from the subject of this report.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The recommended appointment and authorisation of these staff members complies with the relevant provisions of the P&EA and the Local Government Act 1989.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. The recommended appointments and authorisations of these staff members supports the delivery of Council planning services.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No City officers who have provided advice in relation to this report have declared a conflict of interest regarding the matter under consideration.


Risk Assessment

  1. There are no significant or high risks associated with the subject of this report.


Environmental Implications

  1. There are no environmental implications arising from the subject of this report.


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7. Live Streaming and Publishing Recordings of Council Meetings Update

Source:

Governance, Strategy & Performance - Governance

Acting Director:

Rebecca Leonard

Portfolio:

Leadership and Governance


Purpose

  1. To update Council on the performance of live streaming and publishing recordings of Council’s ordinary meetings each month since October 2018.


Background

  1. Live streaming and publishing recordings of Council’s ordinary meetings commenced on 24 July 2018. Since commencement, the number of views of the live streams and the archived meetings has been monitored.


Key Matters

  1. Since commencing in July 2018, live streaming and recording of ordinary Council meetings has been promoted in CityNews, Community Update, Geelong Australia website and on social media channels.

  2. Over the period since the end of October 2018 up to the end of April 2019, a total of 1,843 views have been recorded across live and archived footage. A summary of the monthly views is included at Attachment 2.

  3. The uptake of live streaming and access to published recordings has increased access to Council meetings significantly. During the period an average of 49 people attended council meetings whereas over 170 people were watching proceedings live online.

Councillor Grzybek moved, Councillor Asher seconded -

  1. That Council:

    1. Note the number of views per month of live streaming and published recordings of Council meetings listed Attachment 2; and

    2. Note that the City will report back on the status of access to live-streaming and published recordings of Council meetings by 31 December 2019.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. The total ongoing cost of live streaming Council meetings is approximately $1,300 per month.


Community Engagement

  1. There has been significant uptake of live streaming and access to published Council meeting recordings which has improved public access to Council decision making.

  2. A simple approach to the live streaming of Council meetings has been taken during this initial period. The City will consider ways to enhance the format of the live streaming through feedback from the community.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. Live streaming and publishing recordings of Council meetings facilitates and promotes access by everyone to the decision-making processes of Council.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. Live streaming and publishing recordings of Council meetings is conducted in accordance with the City’s legislative obligations, particularly in relation to privacy, and is governed by the Council’s Live Streaming and Publishing Recordings of Council Meetings Policy.

  2. The Citizen’s Jury recommended that the Council adopt live streaming as one of its recommendations to the Minister.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. Live streaming and publishing recordings of Council meetings aligns with the organisational leadership, strategy and governance pillar of the Council Plan 2018-22, and aligns with the key priority of communicating and engaging more effectively with our community.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No officer involved in the preparation of this report had a direct or indirect interest in the subject of this report.


Risk Assessment

  1. The Council policy addresses the relevant matters required to mitigate the risks associated with live streaming and publishing recordings of Council meetings, including privacy breaches, defamation and document management.


Environmental Implications

  1. There are no direct environmental implications arising from this report.


Attachment 2

Number of Monthly Views

Month

Watched live

Archive views

Total views

November

106

84

190

December

149

96

245

January

142

98

240

February

120

103

223

March

246

263

509

April

258

178

436


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Close of Meeting

As there was no further business the meeting closed at 8:26pm on Tuesday 11 June 2019.


Signed: _________________________________________

Councillor Peter Murrihy (Deputy Mayor)



Date of Confirmation: _____________________________



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