Council Minutes - Section B: Reports - 14 May 2019

Contents | Previous Page: Section A - Procedural Matters |

Reports tabled at the Community Focus Council Meeting of Council on Tuesday 14 May 2019, held at the Belmont Bowls Club, 16-36 Reynolds Road, Belmont.


  1. Amendment C394 - Proposed Coastal Inundation Overlay

  2. Amendment C376 (Part 2) Removal of heritage overlay, Batesford Quarry - Consideration of submissions and adoption

  3. Financial Management Report - March 2019

  4. Council Plan Quarterly Report - March 2018

  5. Women in Community Life Advisory Committee (WICLAC) appointment of new members 2019

  6. G21 Regional Hockey Strategy - Final Report

  7. Greater Geelong and the Bellarine Tourism Development Plan



1. Amendment C394 - Proposed Coastal Inundation Overlay

Source:

Planning, Design & Development – Strategic Implementation

Director:

Garreth Smith

Portfolio:

Sustainable Development


Purpose

  1. To seek Council support to prepare and exhibit Amendment C394 – Proposed Coastal Inundation Overlay.


Background

  1. The amendment proposes to implement the Bellarine Peninsula - Corio Bay Local Coastal Hazard Assessment December 2015. The assessment was prepared by coastal engineers from Cardno as part of Our Coast - a multi-agency project which the City managed and provided funding towards.

  2. The Our Coast program mapped areas around the Bellarine Peninsula and Corio Bay (from Breamlea to Point Wilson) that will be impacted by sea level rise. It included community consultation in 2016 and publishing of maps and other information on the Our Coast website.

  3. Amendment C394 includes policy changes to the Municipal Strategic Statement and applies a new Land Subject to Inundation Overlay (LSIO2) to properties identified as being subject to future flood events and climate change induced sea level rise.


Key Matters

  1. Many of the properties are already subject to Greater Geelong Planning Scheme (Planning Scheme) flood overlays. However, the LSIO2 implements the State Government policy of planning for a 0.8m sea level rise.

  2. Point Lonsdale is being excluded from the amendment at this time as further flood modelling is required that considers The Point waterway system which is currently under construction (see Attachment 2 for details).

  3. The LSIO2 (Attachments 3 and 4) will trigger a planning permit for buildings and works with exemptions including upper storey extensions, additions and outbuildings less than 20 square metres and farm buildings less than 100 square metres.

  4. The amendment applies the LSIO2 to 1726 properties around the City’s coast including 1241 residential zoned properties of which 62 are vacant land (see Attachment 5 maps).

Councillor Mason moved, Councillor Mansfield seconded -

  1. That Council:

    1. Support the preparation and exhibition of Amendment C394 to the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme to:

      1. Amend Clause 21.05 to refer to the Bellarine Peninsula - Corio Bay Local Coastal Hazard Assessment and make minor policy changes;

      2. Introduce Schedule 2 to the Land Subject to Inundation Overlay titled “Coastal Inundation and Hazard” (LSIO2) based on Attachment 4; and

      3. Apply the new LSIO2 to land identified as being inundated by the 1% AEP flood event plus 0.8 metre sea level rise (maps in Attachment 5).

    2. Request the Minister for Planning to authorise the preparation and exhibition of Amendment C394; and

    3. Support the future consideration of applying the LSIO2 to the Point Lonsdale area when further modelling is undertaken that includes The Point waterway system.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. Application of the overlay will not have any significant financial implications to Council with the exception of the usual costs associated with the planning scheme amendment process.

  2. As the proponent and Planning Authority, the City will be responsible for all amendment related costs including landowner notification, panel hearing fees and engagement of expert witnesses at a panel hearing.

  3. Council officers are in discussions with the State Government on obtaining funding to assist with the amendment and hence implement the Our Coast work which was primarily funded by State Government and resourced by the City.


Community Engagement

  1. Community engagement occurred previously as part of “Our Coast” including community open house sessions and publishing of extensive information on the website. This includes the scientific reports, hazard assessments and inundation maps which form the basis of this amendment.

  2. However, while there is information publicly available it is likely that many landowners are not aware that their properties have been identified as potentially affected by future sea level rise.

  3. If Council resolves to support this amendment the public exhibition process will involve a mail out to all affected landowners and notices in local newspapers and the Victoria Government Gazette as required by the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

  4. Interested parties will be able to make submissions which would be considered by Council and most likely referred to an independent panel where submitters could further present their case at a panel hearing.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. The amendment is expected to have positive social impacts. Coastal erosion, flooding, sea level rise and storm surge can result in significant costs for the community and the State. It can severely disrupt communities and in extreme cases, cause extensive damage to public and private property, agricultural losses, personal hardship and potential loss of life. The amendment has positive economic and social benefits by identifying areas where planning permit assessment can reduce the risk of these harms.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The amendment is supported by the following policies from the State section of the planning scheme:

  2. Clause 13.01-2S Coastal inundation and erosion – the amendment achieves the policy objective “to plan for the potential coastal impacts of climate change” and implements the following strategies:

    1. Plan for sea level rise of not less than 0.8 metres by 2100 and allow for the combined effects of tides, storm surges, coastal processes and local conditions such as topography and geology when assessing risks and coastal impacts associated with climate change;

    2. Ensure that land subject to coastal hazards is identified and appropriately managed to ensure that future development is not at risk; and

    3. Avoid development in identified coastal hazard areas susceptible to inundation.

  3. Clause 13.03-1S Floodplain management – the amendment meets the objective to assist in the protection of:

    1. Life, property and community infrastructure from flood hazard;

    2. The natural flood carrying capacity of rivers, streams and floodways;

    3. The flood storage function of floodplains and waterways;

    4. Floodplain areas of environmental significance to river health; and

    5. The amendment also implements the strategies to “Identify land affected by flooding, including land inundated by the 1 in 100 year flood event or as determined by the floodplain management authority in planning schemes” and “Avoid intensifying the impact of flooding through inappropriately located use and development.”

  4. The amendment supports and implements the following policies from the local section of the planning scheme:

  5. Clause 21.05-4 Coastal environments:

    1. The objectives: To protect, maintain and enhance the coast, estuaries and marine environment and to respect and manage coastal processes; and

    2. The strategy: Setback future land use and development from coastal areas, estuaries and coastal wetlands to provide a buffer which is adequate to accommodate coastal recession and the landward migration of coastal wetland vegetation communities such as mangroves and salt marshes.

  6. Clause 21.05-5 Climate change:

    1. The objective: To plan for and adapt to the impacts of climate change; and

    2. The strategy: Avoid land use and development within areas considered at risk of coastal erosion or inundation from flooding, storm surge or rising sea levels.

  7. Clause 21.05-7 Flooding – has relevant objectives:

    1. To protect floodplains; and

    2. To minimise the potential for damage and risks to public safety and property from flooding.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. The proposed amendment aligns with the Council Plan strategic priorities of:

    1. Planned sustainable development – including the priority of improving the environmental performance of new developments, using planning controls; and

    2. Effective environmental management – including the Climate Change Adaptation Strategy and protection of coastal areas.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No Council officers involved in the preparation of the report have a direct or indirect interest in the issue to which this report relates.


Risk Assessment

  1. There is a risk that if Council, as the Planning Authority, does not act on the coastal inundation mapping it has available it may be liable if flooding occurs in the future and damages property. Council can reduce this risk by acting on the scientific based data it has available and applying the appropriate overlay.

  2. The overlay will help reduce risk of property damage as a result of sea level rise and coastal storm events by requiring a planning permit for new dwellings and other buildings and works. This will enable both Council as the Responsible Authority and the Corangamite Catchment Management Authority as the Floodplain Management Authority to apply adaptation measures such as raising building floor levels or building designs that allows periodic inundation to occur.


Environmental Implications

  1. The amendment will help manage the environmental hazard posed by future sea level rise. The Land Subject to Inundation Overlay will trigger a planning permit requirement for relevant buildings and works. This includes new dwellings, subdivision and earthworks that alter natural ground levels. The Responsible Authority and Floodplain Management Authority will be able to assess planning applications in areas identified as potentially vulnerable from future sea level rise and associated environmental hazards such as coastal erosion, flooding and storm surge.


Attachment 2

Background

Bellarine Peninsula - Corio Bay Local Coastal Hazard Assessment (Our Coast Project)

  1. The Our Coast project is a Victorian Government funded initiative and covers the area from Breamlea to Point Wilson. It expands on two previous climate change coastal research projects undertaken by the CSIRO and the Victorian Government (Future Coasts). The Our Coast assessment is known as a “3rd pass” assessment.

  2. The Our Coast Senior Partnership Group has guided the preparation of the Bellarine Corio Bay Coastal Hazard Assessment and the amendment. Agencies involved are: City of Greater Geelong, Borough of Queenscliffe, Department of Land Water Environment and Planning, Corangamite Catchment Management Authority, Barwon Coast Committee of Management and Bellarine Bayside Committee of Management.

  3. The Our Coast website states:

    1. Our climate is changing as a result of global warming. These changes will exacerbate existing coastal hazards such as rising sea levels, storm surges and coastal erosion. The Our Coast project brought local Councils and their communities together to plan for these changes…. the Geelong and Bellarine Peninsula region is one of four Victorian coastal regions to undertake Local Coastal Hazard Assessments.”

  4. The Bellarine Peninsula and Corio Bay LCHA has involved three key steps:

    1. Phase 1 - The Geelong-Queenscliff Coastal Mapping Project – identified areas exposed to erosion and inundation hazards with future sea level rise. This involved a technical assessment of coastal data looking at hazards including catchment inundation, storm surge and erosion; and resulted in a series of hazard maps showing inundation in a range of severe weather events and sea level rise scenarios. The erosion component was not proceeded with following a peer review;

    2. Phase 2 – The Geelong-Queenscliff Coastal Climate Change Risk Assessment - This assessment identified the impact of inundation hazards identified in the Geelong-Queenscliff Coastal Mapping project on coastal communities and adjoining natural areas. In particular, it investigated and prioritised risks to private, public, environmental and social/cultural assets; and

    3. Phase 3 – Geelong-Queenscliff Coastal Adaptation Program - This phase is investigating adaptation solutions and responses to the coastal hazards and risks identified in the earlier stages of the Our Coast program. This project falls within the Phase 3 process.

  5. The Our Coast project does include descriptions of potential adaptation measures that could protect parts of the Bellarine and Corio Bay from sea level rise with examples including:

    1. Constructing a higher seawall at Ocean Grove;

    2. Raising seaside roads at Portarlington;

    3. Raising the railway line at Point Lonsdale; and

    4. Back flow valves on stormwater outlets at Barwon Heads.

  6. However, the aspect of Our Coast that is ready for planning scheme implementation is the Local Coastal Hazard Assessment (LCHA) Inundation Report prepared by Cardno and the associated flood modelling and mapping of different sea level rise and storm event scenarios. This is the aspect that Amendment C394 is seeking to implement.

  7. In 2017 the Our Coast group engaged two experienced planning consultants who are also current and former VCAT and panel members - John Keaney and Michael Kirsch - to provide options on planning scheme implementation for the City of Greater Geelong and Borough of Queenscliffe.

  8. The key element of the LCHA to be implemented is the mapping of coastal inundation based on a 1% Annual Exceedance Probability (AEP) + 0.8m sea level rise. This standard approximates the State policy to “Plan for possible sea level rise of 0.8 metres by 2100...”

  9. Keaney and Kirsch reviewed the various ‘planning scheme’ options that are available to implement this mapping and to apply a set of planning scheme controls.

  10. The key outcomes of the review are:

    1. A preferred planning scheme approach to managing sea level rises based on including all land within the 1% AEP + 0.8m SLR area as identified in the LCHA in a Land Subject to Inundation Overlay (LSIO); and

    2. A draft LSIO schedule (exempting minor buildings and works from permission), a draft Local Planning Policy and draft changes to the two Municipal Strategic Statements.

  11. The approach taken with Amendment C394 directly follows the advice of the Keaney and Kirsh report with some fine tuning to the LSIO schedule.


Discussion

Precedents in other parts of Victoria

  1. Amendment C394 is a large amendment for the City due to the number of coastal residential properties affected. The City is showing leadership in moving to implement sea level rise mapping but there are also other parts of the State where the related LSIO has been successfully applied.

  2. Five other planning scheme amendments have been exhibited and subject to panel reports and subsequently applied the LSIO to areas affected by future sea level rise of 0.8m as follows:

    1. South Gippsland Amendment C81 - applied the LSIO to areas affected by inland flooding and current and predicted coastal inundation, and introduced supporting policy. The LSIO was applied to areas within the predicted 0.8m sea level rise by 2100;

    2. Bass Coast Amendment C82 - applied the LSIO to areas affected by riverine flooding and predicted coastal inundation, and introduced supporting policy. Initiated by the Bass Coast Shire Council, West Gippsland Catchment Management Authority and Melbourne Water, and was approved following a panel hearing in 2014. The exhibited LSIO was applied to areas within the predicted 0.8m sea level rise by 2100;

    3. Moyne Amendment C54 - implemented Stage 1 of the Port Fairy Floodplain Management Plan, and introduced new flood mapping, through the use of the FO and LSIO, together with a new ‘flooding’ policy and Local Floodplain Development Plan. This amendment was approved in December 2014;

    4. Moyne Planning Scheme Amendment C60 - implemented the Port Fairy West Structure Plan and applied the LSIO based on the Future Coasts Port Fairy LCHA 2013. This amendment was the subject of a panel hearing held in 2016. The LSIO mapping was based on available modelling and was applied to the area within the predicted 0.8m sea level rise. This amendment was approved in October 2016; and

    5. Mornington Peninsula Amendment C216 – affecting Westernport Bay in particular around Hastings. It applied the LSIO based on the Western Port Local Coastal Hazard Assessment mapping at 0.8m sea level rise. It was subject to a panel report of August 2018 and was approved in March 2019.

  3. In addition, a Coastal Hazard Assessment is now being undertaken by the State Government for all the coastal land around Port Philip Bay. This will eventually roll out into planning scheme amendment for the bayside municipalities.

  4. Detail of the Amendment

  5. The amendment implements State policy which requires planning authorities to plan for possible sea level rise of 0.8 metres by 2100.

  6. The amendment seeks to:

    1. amend Clause 21.05 Natural Environment to refer to the Bellarine Peninsula - Corio Bay Local Coastal Hazard Assessment December 2015 and include a new objective and strategy at Clause 21.05-5 Climate Change relating to coastal impacts of climate change;

    2. introduce a new Schedule 2 to Clause 44.04 titled “Coastal Inundation and Hazard” (LSIO2); and

    3. apply LSIO2 to land identified in the Bellarine Peninsula - Corio Bay Local Coastal Hazard Assessment December 2015 as being inundated by the combined effects of the 1% Average Event Probability (AEP) flood event plus 0.8 metre sea level rise.

  7. The objectives of LSIO2 include:

    1. to protect land vulnerable to coastal inundation from inappropriate development;

    2. to plan for projected sea level rises to ensure that the community and assets are not exposed to an unacceptable level of risk associated with the coastal impacts of climate change; and

    3. to ensure that any new development is suitably designed to ensure that it is compatible with the identified flood hazard and local drainage characteristics.

  8. Minor policy changes are also required to refer to the Our Coast local coastal hazard assessment.

  9. The Land Subject to Inundation Overlay clause from the Victoria Planning Provisions is in Attachment 3. The specific Schedule proposed under this amendment, LSIO2, is in Attachment 4. Maps of the areas over which the LSIO2 is to be applied are in Attachment 5.

Point Lonsdale area

  1. The Point residential development (previously Stockland) at Point Lonsdale includes a waterway system that will drain this part of Point Lonsdale. The development was subject to a combined Environmental Effects Statement, Amendment (C150) and Planning Permit approximately 10 years ago. As part of this process modelling was undertaken to show how the new waterway system would function under sea level rise and storm surge events. The mapping at the time showed that The Point residential area and some existing residential areas in Point Lonsdale would also benefit from this waterway system as it would reduce the flood impact.

  2. At the time the Our Coast mapping was undertaken The Point waterway was not in existence and hence was not picked up as a topographical feature or part of the drainage system. The mapping produced therefore doesn’t take into account this waterway.

  3. It is proposed that further mapping be undertaken that includes the new waterway and the LSIO2 be applied at a later date under a separate planning scheme amendment.

  4. The City will also continue to liaise with the Borough of Queenscliffe as its part of Point Lonsdale township is also affected by potential sea level rise. Ideally an overlay would be applied as part of a joint amendment involving both municipalities.


Attachment 3 - Land Subject to Inundation Overlay (State provision)

Land Subject to Inundation Overlay (State provision) - page 1 of 3

Land Subject to Inundation Overlay (State provision) - page 2 of 3

Land Subject to Inundation Overlay (State provision) - page 3 of 3

Attachment 4 – Draft Schedule 2 to LSIO

-- / -- 20--

SCHEDULE 2 TO CLAUSE 44.04 LAND SUBJECT TO INUNDATION OVERLAY

 

Shown on the planning scheme map as LSIO2

 

Coastal inundation and hazard

1.0

Land subject to inundation objectives to be achieved

-- / -- 20--

To protect land vulnerable to coastal inundation from inappropriate development.

To plan for projected sea level rises to ensure that the community and assets are not exposed to an unacceptable level of risk associated with the coastal impacts of climate change.

To identify land in coastal areas that may be inundated by the combined effects of the 1% Average Event Probability (AEP) flood event plus 0.8 metre sea level rise.

To ensure that any new development is suitably designed to ensure that it is compatible with the identified flood hazard and local drainage characteristics.

2.0

Statement of risk

-- / -- 20--

A number of areas in the municipality are susceptible to flooding, via the flooding of waterways, stormwater runoff and coastal inundation, which have the potential to result in significant adverse economic, social and environmental impacts. Areas of coastal inundation and hazard have been identified in the Bellarine Peninsula - Corio Bay Local Coastal Hazard Assessment - Inundation Report, Cardno for City of Greater Geelong (2015) which is the source of mapping in this overlay.

3.0

Permit requirement

--/--

A permit is not required to construct a building or carry out works for:

  • An extension to an existing dwelling, provided the gross floor area of the extension does not exceed 20 square metres.

  • Outbuildings and works normal to an existing dwelling including a deck or verandah that do not exceed 20 square metres, landscaping, a pergola, driveway, carport, barbeques and water tank.

  • Agricultural and farm buildings less than 100 square metres in gross floor area.

  • A building which is open on all sides including a domestic shed, animal enclosure, stockyard or agricultural shed.

  • An upper storey extension to an existing building within the existing building footprint.

  • A footpath, bicycle path, boardwalk, tennis court or sports ground provided that they are constructed at ground level.

  • An in-ground domestic swimming pool or spa and associated mechanical and fencing equipment where the excavated spoil is removed and the perimeter edging of the pool is finished at natural ground level.

  • An elevated boardwalk, provided that the new surface levels are above the applicable levels set by the relevant floodplain management authority.

  • Repairs and routine maintenance of existing fences if the fence design and materials remain the same.

  • A radio mast, telecommunications tower, antenna, power pole or light pole.

  • An outdoor advertising sign/structure.

  • Earthworks that do not change the rate of flow or the discharge point of water across a property boundary.

  • Works carried out by any water authority to maintain and replace infrastructure related to sewer and water supply.

  • Works carried out under the Coastal Management Act 1995 or the Crown Land (Reserves) Act 1978 that have had regard to the Bellarine Peninsula – Corio Bay Local Coastal Hazard Assessment and are conducted by a public land manager or a coastal committee under the Coastal Management Act 1995.

4.0

Application requirements

--/--

The following application requirements apply to an application for a permit under Clause 44.04, in addition to those specified in Clause 44.04 and elsewhere in the scheme and must accompany an application, as appropriate, to the satisfaction of the responsible authority:

  • A location plan drawn to scale, showing the boundaries and dimensions of the site, surrounding uses, the layout of existing and proposed buildings and works and the distance to coast or estuary.

  • Elevation plans taken by or under the direction and supervision of a licensed land surveyor showing natural ground level, finished ground level and the floor levels of any existing and proposed buildings in relation to both AHD and the level as nominated by the relevant floodplain management authority at 2100.

  • A detailed site plan with 0.5 metre contours showing the layout of existing and proposed buildings and works, watercourses, access roads, vegetation and all infrastructure that may be affected by flooding, sea level rise or coastal inundation, taken by or under the direction and supervision of a licensed land surveyor.

  • An outline of actions or measures required, if any, to the siting and design of the buildings or works, or in association with the use and occupation of all aspects of the proposal in order to reduce the risk to individuals, property, infrastructure and the environment over the predicted life of the buildings or works. These actions may include the consideration of adaptation options such as planned retreat, setbacks, accommodation of changes through floor heights, site and land forming and drainage works.

5.0

Decision guidelines

--/--

The following decision guidelines apply to an application for a permit under Clause 44.04, in addition to those specified in Clause 44.04 and elsewhere in the scheme which must be considered, as appropriate, by the responsible authority:

  • The views of the Corangamite Catchment Management Authority

  • Bellarine Peninsula - Corio Bay Local Coastal Hazard Assessment - Inundation Report, Cardno for City of Greater Geelong (Dec 2015)



Attachment 5 – Map of areas proposed for Land Subject to Inundation Overlay

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay 0.8m rise

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 1 Avalon

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 2 Limeburners

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 3 Geelong

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 4 Newcomb

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 5 Portarlington

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 6 St Leonards

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 7 Swan Bay

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 8 Barwon Estuary

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 9 Barwon Heads and Ocean Grove

Proposed Land Subject to Inundation Overlay - Map 10 Breamlea


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2. Amendment C376 (Part 2) Removal of heritage overlay, Batesford Quarry - Consideration of submissions and adoption

Source:

Planning, Design & Development – Strategic Implementation

Director:

Gareth Smith

Portfolio:

Sustainable Development


Purpose

  1. To consider the outstanding submissions received in relation to Amendment C376 (Part 2) and seek adoption of the amendment.


Background

  1. Amendment C376 proposed a number of minor changes to the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme. The amendment was a ‘bundled’ amendment, to both correct errors and introduce a number of minor changes to the scheme ordinance and mapping.

  2. Those elements of the amendment which received no objecting submissions were adopted by Council as Amendment C376 Part 1 on 23 October, 2018, with the balance of the amendment being deferred for further consideration as Amendment C376 Part 2.


Key Matters

  1. Having resolved the outstanding issues which were the basis for the remainder of the amendment being deferred, Council can now adopt the balance of the amendment as Amendment C376, Part 2.

  2. Amendment C376 Part 2 relates to the deletion and alterations of heritage overlays for structures in and around the Batesford Quarry.

  3. Attachment 2 sets out the details of the outstanding submitters, the relevant matters raised in their submissions and the basis of the officer recommendation arising from discussion with the submitters about those submissions.

  4. Attachment 3 provides a detailed discussion of the history of and the basis for the recommendation for the deletion / alteration of the two listings from the schedule to the Heritage Overlay.

Councillor Mason moved, Councillor Murrihy seconded -

  1. That Council:

    1. Adopt Amendment C376 Part 2 in the form outlined in Attachment 4 of this report; and

    2. Submit the adopted Amendment C376 Part 2 together with the prescribed information to the Minister for Planning requesting approval.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. There will be no significant financial implications for Council as a result of the adoption of this amendment.


Community Engagement

  1. The amendment was exhibited in accordance with the provisions of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 from 3 May 2018 to 4 June 2018, with four submissions received. Two matters remained to be considered following the adoption of Amendment C376 Part 1.

  2. As those matters have now been resolved to the satisfaction of both the affected submitters the balance of the original amendment can now be adopted as Amendment C376 Part 2.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. The amendment is largely policy neutral and there are no adverse social equity impacts.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The changes proposed by this amendment are essentially of a minor administrative nature. The amendment will result in good planning outcomes by ensuring that inaccurate application of overlay provisions do not result in unnecessary requirements for planning permits.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. The amendment supports the sustainable built and natural environment strategic direction of the Council Plan 2018-22 and is consistent with the strategic direction of community wellbeing and the priority of connected, creative and strong communities.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No City officers or contractors who have provided advice in relation to this report have declared a conflict of interest regarding the matter under consideration.


Risk Assessment

  1. No significant risks associated with implementing the recommendation contained in this report have been identified.


Environmental Implications

  1. The proposed amendment will not have any adverse effects on the environment.


Attachment 2 - Summary of Submissions

No

Name

Address

Type

Summary of Submission

Officer Response

2

Geelong and Region Branch National Trust of Australia (Victoria)

PO Box 1512
Geelong 3220

Supporting

“Supportive of most aspects outlined in Amendment C376.”
Requests investigation as to the following:

  1. Does HO1732 remain in the Planning scheme?

  1. Officers have provided a response confirming that HO1732 is not part of or in any way affected by this amendment.

The City has received correspondence from the submittor advising that they are satisfied with the response.

4

TGM Group Pty Ltd

On behalf of Riverlee Heights Pty Ltd

PO Box 1137
Geelong 3222

Seeking to change the amendment

“If … a representative section of the conveyor be retained, this should preferably be at ground level in an open space reserve or included in the existing Public Conservation and Resource Zoned land adjacent to the Moorabool River where the existing overlay is in place.”

Relates to the proposed change to the extent of the proposed extension of HO 1740.

Following consideration of the submission, the officer recommendation proposes that, consistent with the submission, Council not proceed to extend the application of HI1740 in the manner exhibited.

The City has received correspondence from the submittor advising that they are satisfied with this outcome.



Attachment 3

Discussion

  1. The decision to prepare and exhibit the amendment was made by a delegated City officer on 2 March 2018. The amendment is a ‘bundled’ amendment, to both correct errors and introduce a number of minor changes to the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme ordinance and mapping.

Amendment C376 Part 2

  1. The following elements of the exhibited amendment were deferred at the time of adoption of Amendment C376 Part 1, in order to allow for further consideration and for consultation with objecting submitters, where required.

  2. Land affected:

    1. Batesford Quarry

  3. Detailed changes:

    1. The exhibited amendment proposed the following detailed changes to the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme.

    2. Planning Scheme Map Changes:

    3. Delete HO45 from the land at Batesford Quarry; and

    4. Delete HO1740 from part of the land at Batesford Quarry, and apply HO1740 to another part of the land at Batesford Quarry, consistent with the remaining extent of the overhead conveyor structure.

    5. Planning Scheme Ordinance Changes:

    6. Amend the Schedule to Clause 43.01 to delete the entry for HO43.

    Officer Consideration

  4. HO45 – Bachyrus Railroad Steam Shovel

    1. This is a large, 19th Century steam powered excavation shovel, mounted on rails to allow for movement along the face of the excavation works. The shovel mechanism swivels to permit the removal of material and its placement in vehicles for removal from the quarry;

    2. The shovel represents an antiquated form of mechanical excavation, which has long since been replaced by smaller, more manoeuvrable diggers powered by internal combustion engines. Consequently, the Bachyrus shovel had fallen into disrepair as a result of not having been used for many years;

    3. In order to facilitate the removal of product from the area occupied by the steam shovel and other redundant infrastructure, the shovel was removed from the land in 2010 and relocated to Lake Goldsmith, in the Pyrenees Shire, where it has been restored to operational condition; and

    4. The following four photos identify the chronology of the removal of the Bachyrus Steam Shovel and other redundant structures from the land between late 2009 and mid-2010, together with the subsequent extraction of material up until the present time.

    November 2009 - Conveyor Infrastructure and Bachyrus Railroad Steam Shovel in situ

    November 2009 - Conveyor Infrastructure and Bachyrus Railroad Steam Shovel in situ.

    January 2010 – Conveyor infrastructure removed

    January 2010 – Conveyor infrastructure removed.

    July 2010 – Bachyrus Railroad Steam Shovel removed

    July 2010 – Bachyrus Railroad Steam Shovel removed.

    February 2019 – Site now extensively mined no heritage significance remains.

    February 2019 – Site now extensively mined no heritage significance remains.

  5. HO1740 – Elevated Conveyor structure

    1. This structure of prefabricated concrete trestles and boxed spans was erected in the mid-20th century to convey material extracted from the quarry to the Geelong Cement Works which overlook Batesford from the escarpment, south east of the site;

    2. As is evident from the preceding photos, the disused conveyor structure was removed from the land in early 2010 in order to facilitate the mining of the portion of the quarry which it occupied;

    3. The only remaining spans of the conveyor which are currently located within the area protected by HO1740 are located on public land in the Public Conservation and Resource Zone (PCRZ). The conveyor spans the Moorabool river, and on the eastern side of the Moorabool River, between the river and the unconstructed portion of Church Street;

    4. Both HO45 and the section of HO1740 which is to be deleted are located within the Western Growth Area. The plan of the growth area on the following page indicates the location of the heritage overlays which are to be removed. In particular, it is evident that both HO45 and the majority of HO1740 are located within a lake and water body which is proposed to be created in the existing quarry; and

    5. The exhibited amendment had proposed to extend the application of HO1740 to remaining sections of the conveyor structure in the farming zone, between the eastern side of the Moorabool River and the Geelong Ring Road. However, following the consideration of an objecting submission lodged on behalf of the owner of this land, it is recommended that this not occur. The submitter has advised the City that this recommendation satisfies their objection.

  6. Officer Assessment

    1. In view of the previous removal of the heritage items from the land, it is considered that the continued application of HO45 and the section of HO1740, to the extent identified on the map which forms part of Attachment 3 to this report, is redundant, and that the identified areas of the mapped application of HO45 and HO1740 should be deleted from the planning scheme; and

    2. Following discussions with the objecting submitter regarding the exhibited proposal to extend the application of HO1740, it is considered that this should not proceed.

    Redundant Heritage listings to be removed. Note location of the “Lake Waterbody” in the former quarry.

    Redundant Heritage listings to be removed. Note location of the “Lake Waterbody” in the former quarry.


Attachment 4 - Amendment to be Adopted

Planning amendment C376 Part 2 - Instruction Sheet

Deletion HO45 and Part HO1740

Deletion HO45 and Part HO1740

Clause 43.01 – Extract of changes to Heritage Overlay

Clause 43.01 – Extract of changes to Heritage Overlay

[Back to List]

3. Financial Management Report - March 2019

Source:

Customer & Corporate Services – Financial Services

Director:

Michael Dugina

Portfolio:

Finance


Purpose

  1. To present to Council the Financial Performance information to 31 March 2019.


Background

  1. On 26 June 2018 the Final Budget was adopted with a recurrent deficit of ($8.0 million) and higher opening cash balance of $81.6 million. This recognised the early receipt in 2017-2018 of expected 2018-2019 Commonwealth Government Grants Commission funding (50% of allocation). On 28 August 2018 Council approved the carryover of capital and non-capital project funding into 2018-2019.

  2. This change known as 2018-2019 projection was in response to funding allocated in 2017‑2018 for projects not completed, resulting in higher than expected opening cash balance of $102.6 million. The 2018-2019 recurrent projection is an operating deficit of ($17.3 million) and non-recurrent surplus of $78.8 million.The 2018-2019 full year projected net result is a surplus of $61.5 million.

  3. The financial statements and commentary is for the period July 2018 – March 2019, which compares the budget projection with actual revenue and expense.


Key Matters

  1. The recurrent operating result for the nine month period is a surplus of $6.2 million. The projected position was a deficit of ($11.6 million) so the result represents a better than anticipated outcome of $17.8 million. It is expected however that in the full year this surplus will reduce to our projected position of ($7.0 million) deficit. A summary of the year to date variances are provided in Attachment 1 of this report.

  2. Capital expenditure year to date is $80.8 million against a projection of $93.2 million. It is anticipated that there will be a carryover figure of $26.5 million (as budgeted) for works not completed by the end of the financial year. This figure will be reviewed during the final quarter of 2018-2019. A summary of capital expenditure variances is provided on Attachment 1 of this report.

  3. The cash and investment balance of $97.9 million is $15.9 million lower than expected at this stage of the year mainly due to new loans not being taken out, partly offset by capital spend behind schedule. A summary of the cash and investments is provided on Attachment 1 of this report.

  4. The non-recurrent result (for example: gifted assets from development, sale of properties, developer cash contributions to infrastructure etc.) for the half year period was a surplus of $73.8 million. This was $26.5 million favourable to the anticipated position. At the end of the year it is expected that the position will be $29.6 million better than anticipated. A summary of the non-recurrent variances is provided on Attachment 1 of this report.

  5. There were no environmental upgrade agreements entered into for the quarter. The existing agreement is valued at $115,000.

Councillor Murnane moved, Councillor Nelson seconded -

  1. That Council endorse the Financial Report to 31 March 2019.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Discussion

  1. The 2018-2019 full year projected net result is a surplus of $61.5 million. Refer following Table:

  2.  

    Expenditure
    $’000

    Income
    $’000

    Surplus/(Deficit)
    $’000

    Opening Cash Balance
    million

    Council Draft 2018-2019 Budget - Recurrent Surplus/(Deficit)

    354,553

    356,831

    2,278

    $63.7

    Grants Commission 2018-2019 - 50% received in 2017-2018

     

    (10,271)

    (10,271)

    Council adopted 2018-2019 Budget - Recurrent Surplus/(Deficit)

    354,553

    346,560

    (7,993)

    $81.6

    2017-2018 Non Capital Carryover Requests

    9,360

    79

    (9,281)

     

    2018-2019 Recurrent Projection

    363,913

    346,639

    (17,274)

    $102.6

    Non Recurrent Surplus/(Deficit)

    6,190

    84,989

    78,799

     

    Net Result Surplus/(Deficit)

    370,103

    431,628

    61,525

     


  3. The March 2019 management reports are provided in the following table to report year‑to-date performance and full-year forecast performance versus projection.

  4. Summary

     

    YTD Actual
    $ million

    YTD Projection
    $ million

    YTD Var Fav/ (Unfav)
    $ million

    Projection
    $ million

    FY Forecast
    $ million

    FY Var Fav/ (Unfav)
    $ million

    Recurrent Surplus/(Deficit)

    6.25

    (11.55)

    17.80

    (17.27)

    (6.97)

    10.30

    Non-Recurrent Surplus/(Deficit)

    73.80

    47.30

    26.50

    78.80

    108.48

    29.68

    Net Surplus/(Deficit)

    80.05

    35.75

    44.30

    61.52

    101.50

    39.98

    Capital Expenditure

    80.75

    93.20

    12.45

    127.22

    131.10

    (3.88)

    Closing Net Cash
    Positive/(Neg)

    97.85

    113.71

    (15.86)

    92.22

     

     



    Recurrent Variance Commentary

     

    YTD Actual
    $ million

    YTD Projection
    $ million

    YTD Var Fav/ (Unfav)
    $ million

    Projection
    $ million

    FY Forecast
    $ million

    FY Var Fav/ (Unfav)
    $ million

    Recurrent Income

    267.91

    260.80

    7.11

    346.64

    353.56

    6.92

    Recurrent Expenditure

    261.67

    272.36

    10.69

    363.91

    360.53

    3.38

    Recurrent Surplus/(Deficit)

    6.25

    (11.55)

    17.80

    (17.27)

    (6.97)

    10.30

    YTD Variance - $17.80 million Favourable



  5. The following major variances contributed to this result:

  6. Recurrent Income

     

    Actual YTD
    $ million

    Variance Fav/(Unfav)
    $ million

    General Rates and Charges – Supplementary rates $1,026k favourable, in addition to other favourable rates generation YTD, expected to be partly offset by objections in full year.

    172.05

    1.53

    Government Grants

    Main favourable variances consist of:

    • Federal recurrent $1,435,000 favourable – Community Care $1,433,000 (Home Care Packages $1,131k and Commonwealth Home Support Program $248,000).

    • State specific purpose $992k favourable – Phasing variance in City Services Admin $60k. Unbudgeted grants received – Bell Park Soccer Club $225,000, Lara Flood Study $157,000, Storm water Service Strategy $100k, SHIP Housing Strategy $100,000, Agribusiness Strategy $75,000, Geelong Regional Bowls Facility $65k, Geelong After Dark $60k and St Helens Seawall Remediation $50k.

    • State recurrent $492k favourable – Family Services $189,000 (Community Child Health). Unbudgeted grant received – Vic Roads School Grant – School Crossing Supervisor Subsidy) $304,000.

    • Offset by:

    • Federal child care assistance ($662k) unfavourable – Family Services ($699k) (Whittington LDC $604k & Family Day Care $212,000, offset by Integrated Children Centres $225,000 favourable).

    • Federal – Other ($195,000) unfavourable – Grants Commission funding unfavourable.

    34.47

    2.09

    User Charges

    Main favourable variances consist of:

    • Waste Services – $1,492,000 favourable – Disposal $759,000 (Drysdale Landfill Operations) and Collection $733,000 (North Geelong transfer station $656,000 and Commercial Collection Services $84,000).

    • Development Planning $860,000 favourable – Subdivision application fees.

    • Offset by:

    • Leisure & Recreation ($796,000) unfavourable (Arena $252,000, Waterworld $136,000, Corio Leisuretime $118,000 and Golf Courses $89,000) and City Works ($316,000) (SZ Reinstatements)

    43.06

    1.14

    Other Fees & Charges

    Favourable mainly due to:

    • Fines and Costs $979k favourable – General cost overrun $782,000, offset by expenditure, Fire Prevention $122,000 and Council Election penalties $110,000.

    • Planning and building permit applications $849k favourable.

    11.56

    1.70

    Sundry Income

    • Unbudgeted miscellaneous income received.

    5.36

    0.67

    Interest on Investments

    1.41

    (0.02)

    Recurrent Income Sub-total

    $267.91

    $7.11


    Recurrent Expenditure

     

    Actual YTD
    $ million

    Variance Fav/(Unfav)
    $ million

    Employee related expenditure – Favourable salary related costs $6,851,000 mainly relating to unfilled vacancies.

    Offset by unfavourable supplementary labour costs ($6,045,000) (see external services).

    107.00

    6.93

    General Works:

    Materials $804,000 favourable with the main variances being Road making materials $1,207,000 and cleaning $163,000 (both phasing only), offset by consumable materials ($740,000) unfavourable (Home Care Packages).

    Plant / Equip / Vehicle Costs $882,000 favourable with the main variances being External plant & equipment hire $568,000, Minor Plant & Equipment $162,000 and Vehicle Maintenance $113,000 (all phasing).

    External Services is ($1,775,000) unfavourable mainly due to:

    • Contractors $4,956,000 favourable - Phasing variances in discretionary projects $2,199,000 (incl $1,068,000 unbudgeted for General cost overrun (partly offset in income) and in recurrent projects $2,757,000.

    • Contributions $744,000 favourable - phasing variances mainly in Events Services $445,000 and Developer Contribution Plans $327,000 (Armstrong Creek East).

    • Offset by:

    • Supplementary labour ($6,045,000) unfavourable – mainly in Community Care ($2,28,000k), City Works ($906,000), Engineering ($600,000), City Development ($587,000), Parks & Gardens ($512,000), Waste ($297,000), Health & Local Laws ($248,000), Property & Procurement ($195,000) and Central Geelong & Waterfront ($143,000).

    • Waste Disposal & Recycling ($907k) unfavourable - Garbage Service ($1,282k), North Geelong Transfer Station ($1,032k), Litter Service ($138k) and Commercial Collection ($106k) (due to diversion of waste to Wyndham), partly offset by Green Waste Service $1,024k fav (low tonnages in winter & dry summer) and Recycling Service $739k fav.

    • Building Maintenance ($657k) unfavourable.

    87.20

    0.07

    Administration costs $376,000 favourable mainly due to:

    • Favourable Interest Paid $502,000, Training & Development $431,000 and Printing $107,000, partly offset by unfavourable Doubtful Debts ($612,000) unfavourable (Local Laws - Infringements) and Computer Software ($111,000).

    9.02

    0.38

    Professional Services costs $783,000 favourable mainly due to:

    • Favourable phasing variances in Consultants $1,301,000, partly offset by Legal expenses ($595,000) unfavourable.

    4.81

    0.78

    Utility costs are $831,000 favourable mainly due to phasing and timing of invoices related to Electricity $755,000, Gas $344,000 and Communications $221,000, partly offset by Water ($490,000) – dry summer months.

    8.16

    0.83

    Depreciation costs $1,223,000 favourable (timing of capitalisations).

    45.95

    1.22

    (Gain)/Loss on Sale of Plant and Equipment $475,000 favourable.

    (0.47)

    0.48

    Recurrent Expenditure Sub-total

    $261.67

    $10.69


    Recurrent Full Year Forecast

  7. The 2018-2019 full year recurrent forecast shows a deficit of ($6.97 million), which is an improvement of $10.30m against projection, based on the year to date favourability as outlined in section 3 (above). An increase in expenditure during Q4 is expected, due to the appointment of additional FTE’s, a higher volume of invoicing (prior year trend suggests this) and the increased focus on accruing external expenditure prior to year.

  8. Non Recurrent Variance Commentary

     

    YTD Actual
    $ million

    YTD Projection
    $ million

    YTD Var Fav/ (Unfav)
    $ million

    FY Projection
    $ million

    FY Forecast
    $ million

    FY Var Fav/(Unfav)
    $ million

    Non-Recurrent Surplus/(Deficit)

    73.80

    47.30

    26.50

    78.80

    108.48

    29.68

    YTD Variance – $26.50 million favourable


  9. The following variances contributed to this result:

  10.  

    Actual YTD
    $ million

    Variance Fav/(Unfav)
    $ million

    Subdivision gifted assets

    56.17

    522.42

    Capital grants & income

    15.52

    0.92

    Developer contributions

    4.29

    0.87

    Gain/(Loss) on sale of property

    (0.12)

    (0.28)

    Loss on disposal of infrastructure

    (1.08)

    3.56

    Prior Year Adjustments

    (0.98)

    (0.98)

     

    $73.80

    $26.50


    Non Recurrent Full Year Forecast

  11. The 2018-2019 full year non recurrent forecast has improved by $29.68m to a surplus of $108.48 million, due to the higher than expected recognition of subdivision infrastructure $22.4 million, higher capital grants received over the full year $4.5m and an increase in the gain on sale of property $1.9 million (mainly relating to unbudgeted sales of 702 Grubb Road, Drysdale and the Geelong Ring Road Employment Precinct).

  12. The full year net operating forecast is $101.50 million, an increase of $39.98 million.

  13.  

    Annual Projection
    $’000

    Annual Forecast
    $’000

    Movement
    $’000

    Recurrent Income

    346,639

    353,558

    6,919

    Recurrent Expenses

    363,913

    360,533

    3,380

    Recurrent Surplus/(Deficit)

    (17,274)

    (6,975)

    10,299

    Non Recurrent Surplus/(Deficit)

    78,799

    108,482

    29,683

    Net Surplus/(Deficit)

    61,525

    101,507

    39,982


    Capital Expenditure Variance Commentary

     

    YTD Actual
    $ million

    YTD Projection
    $ million

    Fav/(Unfav)
    $ million

    Projection
    $ million

    FY Forecast
    $ million

    Fav/(Unfav)
    $ million

    Capital Expenditure

    80.75

    93.20

    12.45

    127.22

    131.10

    (3.88)

    YTD Variance – $12.46 million favourable


  14. The capital program is $12.46 million underspent, with the major project variances as follows:

  15.  

    $ million

    • Fleet Replacement

    1.91

    • Land Acquisition Fyansford

    1.70

    • Elcho Channel SRC Scheme

    1.62

    • Building renewal works

    1.31

    • Building Better Bike Connections

    1.16

    • Leopold Community Hub Stage 2

    0.93

    • Drainage Construction

    0.92

    • Osborne House Remedial Works

    0.70

    • Drysdale Integrated Children’s & Family Centre

    0.63

    • Rosewall Community Hub

    0.55

    • Beach house landlord works

    0.50

    • IT Asset Replacement

    0.50

    • Purnell Road CFC

    (1.16)

    • Other

    1.19

     

    $ 12.46m


  16. Forecast changes to capital projects at 31 March 2019, recommended by the Capital Works Project Group and approved by the CEO.

  17. Project ID

    Name

    Transfer Amount

    From

    Date CWPG Recommended

    C19404

    Lara Soccer Pavilion

    $165,000

    Fund from $250,000 savings on Flinders Peak (C16807)

    28/08/2018

    C19424

    Griggs Creek

    $100,000

    To take from overall capital program savings

    28/08/2018

    C15812

    Western Beach Park

    $120,000

    Transfer from saving on C18422 Eastern Beach footpath

    25/09/2018

    C13857

    Corio Landfill Rehabilitation

    $100,000

    Savings as per CPWG

    14/11/2018

    C15841

    Leopold Community Hub Stage 2

    $540,000

    Savings as per CPWG

    14/11/2018

    C17201

    Drysdale Landfill Cell 5

    $650,000

    Savings as per CPWG

    14/11/2018

    C68051

    ACEP NAC Community Complex

    $700,000

    Savings as per CPWG

    14/11/2018

    C68204

    DCP- Barwon Heads Rd to Harriot Rd land Acquisition

    $1,684,661

    Savings as per CPWG (Harriot Rd Drainage Project funded in 2019-20 at $1.25m

    14/11/2018

    C19201

    Waterworld Canopy

    $240,000

    Savings as per CPWG

    14/11/2018

    C19303

    Innovation Drive GREP

    $280,000

    Savings as per CPWG

    17/01/2019

    C19423

    Belmont Depot Washbay

    ($206,000)

    Increase as per CPWG

    17/01/2019

    C19419

    Bell Post Hill Sport & Rec Club Kitchen Upgrade

    ($95,000)

    Increase as per CPWG

    14/02/2019


  18. Carryover of expenditure to 2019-20 on incomplete projects as at 30 June 2019 is projected to be as budgeted $26.5 million and this will be further reviewed during the fourth quarter.

  19. The graph below summarises total capital gross expenditure to date compared to budget and projection.

  20. 2018-2019 Capital Projects Program - Total expenditure

    Environmental Upgrade Agreements

    1. An environmental upgrade agreement was entered into for Lot 2 on Plan Subdivision 041455, Volume 08704 Folio 526.

    2. Council only has one environmental upgrade agreement in place.

    3. The total charge for this agreement is $115,000 and all payments that have fallen due have been remitted.

    4. The total value of payments that are yet to fall due is $95,000.

    Detailed operating statement as at 31 March 2019

    Financial Statement as at 31 March 2019

    Statement of Cash Flows as at 31 March 2019

    Cash and Investments

     

    YTD Actual
    $ million

    YTD Projection
    $ million

    YTD Var Fav/ (Unfav)
    $ million

    FY Projection
    $ million

    FY Forecast
    $ million

    FY Var Fav/ (Unfav)
    $ million

    Closing Net Cash Positive/(Neg)

    97.85

    113.71

    (15.86)

    92.22

    N/A

    N/A

    YTD Variance – ($15.86m) unfavourable


  21. The month end cash and investments balance was $97.8 5illionm. This was ($15.86 million) unfavourable, mainly due to new loans not being taken out, partly offset by capital spend behind schedule.

  22. Council has future commitments for $33.73 million, which are fully cashed back:

    Long Service Leave

    $22.3 million

    Statutory Reserves

    $3.8 million

    Refundable Deposits

    $5.9 million

    Income in Advance

    $1.2 million

    Asset Development

    $0.5 million

    Total

    $33.7 million


    The Landfill Provision balance is currently $13.0 million.

  23. Working capital funds are invested in short term deposits and investment returns are as follows.

  24. Council's Actual Investment Return v Budgeted Return in thousands

  25. Investment returns are currently $15k below budget and $165k down compared to the same time last year.


Financial Performance Indicators

As at 31 March 2019

Recurrent surplus/deficit YTD surplus higher than projection due to favourble income and lower contractor costs. 2018-2019 projection lower than prior year actuals due to early receipt of $10 million from Grants Commission in June 2018, however relates to the 2018-2019 year.

Total surplus/deficit Favourable YTD mostly due to higher subdivision gifted assets and the current favourable reccurent position.

2018-2019 Capital projects program - total expenditure Slight favourability v projection YTD mostly due to plan phasing/timing of projects.

Working capital (current assets v current liabilities) Working capital ratio tracking in line with prior year, however is lower than nbudget YTD, mostly due to higher unearned income $59,ooo YTD, which is expected to reduce at year end.

Rates and charges collections Tracking in line with budget.

Attachment 2

Financial Implications

  1. Any financial implications are addressed within the body of the report.


Community Engagement

  1. Project managers have been consulted and provided the latest project updates which have been factored into this report.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. There are no social equity implications arising from the subject of this report.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The report is provided in accordance with requirements under the Local Government Act 1989.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. This report is aligned to the council plan strategic objective ‘Organisational Leadership, Strategy and Governance.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No Council officers or contractors who have provided advice in relation to this report have declared a conflict of interest regarding the matter under consideration.


Risk Assessment

  1. There are no high or extreme risks arising from the subject of this report.


Environmental Implications

  1. There are no environmental implications arising from the subject of this report.


[Back to List]

4. Herne Hill Reserve Master Plan - Final Report

Source:

Governance, Strategy & Performance – Strategy, Engagement & Performance

Executive Manager:

Rebecca Leonard

Portfolio:

Strategy and Communications


Purpose

  1. To present the Council Plan Quarterly Report – March 2019 for consideration and endorsement by Council.


Background

  1. Council adopted the 2018–22 Council Plan at the Council Meeting on 26 June 2018. The Council Plan identified the objective and priorities of Council. The Council Plan Quarterly Report – March 2019 (Report) tracks the progress against Council Plan’s 11 strategic priorities and the one year aims.


Key Matters

  1. There are 84 key priorities and 56 aims. At the end of March 2019, the majority of these were on track year to date with:

    1. Six ‘completed’ to date with three completed in the March quarter:

    2. One ‘not started’:

    3. Five ‘needs improvement’:

Councillor Murnane moved, Councillor Nelson seconded -

  1. That Council endorse the Council Plan Quarterly Report – March 2019, which will be made available to the community on the Council website.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. There are no financial implications arising from the subject of this report.


Community Engagement

  1. The report has been prepared in consultation with officers from across the organisation. The report will be made available to the community online through Council’s website four times a year.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. The report documents the work Council is undertaking in relation to improving access and inclusion for all.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The City’s activities are guided by the Council Plan 2018–2022, which was adopted in accordance with the Local Government Act 1989. The implementation of the council plan is monitored via the quarterly report.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. The report has been developed to meet our commitment to transparently report, including progress on council plan key priorities and aims.


Conflict of Interest

  1. There have been no direct or indirect interests declared.


Risk Assessment

  1. There are no identified risks arising from this report.


Environmental Implications

  1. There are no identified environmental implications arising from this report.


[Back to List]

5. Women in Community Life Advisory Committee (WICLAC) appointment of new members 2019

Source:

Community Life – Healthy Communities

Director:

Robyn Stevens

Portfolio:

An Inclusive and Diverse Community


Purpose

  1. To seek endorsement from Council to appoint new members to the Women in Community Life Advisory Committee.


Background

  1. The Women in Community Life Advisory Committee (WiCLAC) was established in 2013 to provide advice to Council on matters relating to women’s participation, representation and leadership in community life.

  2. The WiCLAC is a proactive and dedicated group, focussed on achieving positive outcomes of equality, inclusion and respect for women in the Geelong region. Members must demonstrate:

    1. Commitment to furthering women’s participation, representation and leadership in community life;

    2. Commitment to the Victorian Local Government Women’s Charter;

    3. Commitment to advocacy of Ba-Gurrk, A Gender Equity Framework for the Greater Geelong Region;

    4. Involvement in women’s and other networks;

    5. Commitment and time to actively participate on the Committee; and

    6. Capacity to share and promote the work of the Committee to others.


Key Matters

  1. The Committee called for applications to fill the roles of recently vacated members. There are currently six members and the terms of reference (Attachment 2) allow for eight to 12 members.

  2. The opportunity to apply was promoted via social media and relevant networks, as well as contacting people who had previously expressed interest in joining the Committee. The term of the appointment is until early 2021. A new terms of reference, currently being drafted, will align committee members’ terms with the conclusion of Council elections.

  3. Applications were lodged on the Geelong Australia website and 11 were received. The applications were assessed by a panel comprising two WiCLAC members and one City officer. The assessment panel recommend the appointment of Lynne Beaumont, Emma Cvitak, Rachel Drady, Emily Kerr, Soraya Mobayad and Kara Tieman (bios at Attachment 3), who would bring relevant skills and experience to the Committee.

Councillor Mansfield moved, Councillor Sullivan seconded -

  1. That Council appoint Lynne Beaumont, Emma Cvitak, Rachel Drady, Emily Kerr, Soraya Mobayad and Kara Tieman to the Women in Community Life Advisory Committee for a term ending no later than 31 March 2021.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. There are no significant financial implications. Under its terms of reference, the WiCLAC has no financial delegation authority.


Community Engagement

  1. The opportunity to apply for WiCLAC membership was promoted via social media and relevant networks, as well as contacting people who had previously expressed interest in joining the Committee.

  2. This Committee, in the course of its work, engages with the City’s leadership and the broader community in relation to improving civic, economic and general opportunities for women.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. WiCLAC has the following social equity objectives:

    1. Advocacy - to advocate across the Geelong region for women to be actively involved in decision making processes that deliver relevant, responsive and inclusive outcomes;

    2. Education and Training - to promote opportunities for women to undertake training, leadership and volunteering; and

  2. The Committee clearly aligns with, and is supported by the United Nations Human Rights Charter. Principles of freedom, respect, equality and dignity are promoted by the HRC, and these are incorporated in the Victorian Local Government Women’s Charter, which is a guiding document to the Committee.

  3. As this group provides a voice and reference for women across the region, the City aims to ensure it is reflective of the community in which we live. With that in mind, group membership includes people of all abilities, diverse ages, cultures, geographical locations and life experiences.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. There are no statutory implications.

  2. The Committee reflects Council’s position as a signatory to the Victorian Local Government Women’s Charter.

  3. The Ba-gurrk Gender Equity Framework for the Greater Geelong Region, endorsed by Council in February 2019, informs the direction of WiCLAC, alongside the Victorian Local Government Women’s Charter 2010. WiCLAC will provide advice and input into the implementation of the Ba-gurrk Gender Equity Action Plan, currently being developed, and review its progress as required.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. All aspects of Council Plan 2018-22 can be delivered by considering a gender equal approach; ensuring consultation, project development, design, management and governance have equal representation and input from women.

  2. In particular, strategic priority 1 ‘Improved Health and Safety of Our Community’; key priority 1 ‘Showing leadership in gender equity, diversity and family violence prevention’ is the core work of WiCLAC.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No City officers or contractors who have provided advice in relation to this report have declared a conflict of interest regarding the matter under consideration.


Risk Assessment

  1. There are a number of reputational and governance risks if new members are not appointed to the committee:

    1. The committee is at risk of not achieving quorum;

    2. There is reduced capacity for the committee to achieve its goals; and

    3. There are reduced opportunities for people to contribute to the City’s work in gender equity.


Environmental Implications

  1. There are no environmental implications arising from the subject of this report.


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6. G21 Regional Hockey Strategy - final report

Source:

Community Life – Social Planning & Investment

Director:

Robyn Stevens

Portfolio:

Social and Infrastructure Planning


Purpose

  1. To seek Council endorsement for the G21 Regional Hockey Strategy.


Background

  1. The G21 Regional Hockey Strategy (Strategy) identifies a collective direction for hockey across the region. The strategy provides a framework to support the future development, governance and growth of the sport over the next 10 years. The strategy is a collaborative planning project between the G21 Region Alliance, local government authorities (LGAs) in the G21 Region, Hockey Victoria and other key stakeholders. Council approved the release of the draft G21 Hockey Strategy for a six-week public exhibition period in October 2018.


Key Matters

  1. The development of the strategy included comprehensive consultation with the hockey community; including workshops with key stakeholders, a member survey, a six-week public exhibition period and a Project Control Group (PCG) with representatives from each G21 council and Hockey Victoria.

  2. The document has been endorsed by the G21 Sport & Recreation Pillar and will proceed to the G21 Board for endorsement following Council’s resolution.

  3. The strategy has identified 6 strategic priorities which aim to improve and develop the sport. These are:

    1. Priority 1 - Provide functional and accessible hockey facilities;

    2. Priority 2 - Increase capacity of existing facilities and deliver new pitches to meet future demand;

    3. Priority 3 - Increase hockey participation through improved programming;

    4. Priority 4 - Embrace new formats that engage new participants;

    5. Priority 5 - Adopt strategies that support the development of sustainable clubs; and

    6. Priority 6 - Promote hockey in the G21 region through collective marketing strategies and initiatives.

  4. There are no immediate investment or resource implications for the City in the final strategy.

  5. The main priority in the strategy is to improve participation and access to existing hockey facilities in the region.

Councillor Murrihy moved, Councillor Nelson seconded -

  1. That Council endorse the final G21 Regional Hockey Strategy.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. There are no financial implications arising from this report.

  1. Funding for strategy actions in the future will be sought through a range of funding opportunities and through Council’s annual budget process.


Community Engagement

  1. The strategy provides a strategic framework to support the development, governance and growth of hockey in the G21 region over the next 10 years.

  2. The strategy demonstrates that, to achieve the identified strategic priorities, there must be a collaborative approach between sport, local and state governments.

  3. The strategy provides regional directions and recommendations, as well as prioritising actions to be delivered by Hockey Victoria, Geelong Hockey Association, local clubs and LGAs.

  4. The development of the strategy has included comprehensive consultation with the hockey community alongside a Project Control Group (PCG) comprising representatives from each G21 council, Hockey Victoria and the Geelong Hockey Association.

  5. Consultation with stakeholders included a workshop and a member survey of all registered players within the region. In addition, public exhibition of the draft strategy was undertaken between 26 October 26 2018 and 7 December 7 2018 with a total of 18 submissions received from both individuals and clubs (Attachment 3). The submissions resulted in two minor changes to the document with content being approved by the Project Control Group (PCG).

  6. The key findings from the community engagement period during the development of the strategy have identified:

    1. A need for better quality hockey facilities and supporting amenities;

    2. Employment of a Hockey Victoria regional club development officer;

    3. Additional satellite facility provision to minimise travel times as this was considered to be a significant barrier to participation;

    4. Partnerships with councils, Hockey Victoria and state government to further develop the game; and

    5. Strategies to recruit new participants and increase participation.

  7. As a result of the engagement and the ongoing work through the PCG, the strategy has identified six strategic priorities. These are:

    1. Provide functional and accessible hockey facilities – The strategy identified that existing hockey facilities, particularly those on education land, could be activated more broadly to support participation. With fewer hockey pitches in G21 than in comparison to more popular sports, there is general consensus among the hockey community that there is a requirement to travel to play hockey. The opportunity to improve access to existing pitches will assist in the provision of satellite and training venues for local demand. A critical action under this priority is for Hockey Victoria and the Geelong Hockey Association to strengthen partnerships with schools to facilitate broader hockey facility access;

    2. Increase the capacity of existing facilities and deliver new pitches to meet future demand - Floodlighting is identified in the strategy as a way to support participation growth through increasing the capacity of existing venues. While the provision of hockey pitches to population ratio is well within recommended limits, floodlighting existing venues will allow these facilities to be programmed longer throughout the winter season, improving opportunities for people to participate. As most hockey pitches in G21 are located within Geelong’s municipal boundaries, there is not equitable access to facilities across the network. The majority of senior hockey competition and training is at Stead Park, Corio which presents a barrier due to travel time, particularly for those outside Geelong. There are important actions for that support this strategy, including:

      1. The City to work in partnership with Hockey Victoria to advocate for the inclusion of multi-purpose hockey pitches within the Armstrong Creek West Regional Sporting Precinct. The draft master plan for this precinct identifies two multi-use hockey pitches alongside soccer and tennis facilities. The strategy identifies the importance of hockey retaining this presence to assist in addressing the gap in hockey facilities from a regional perspective in the medium to long term;

      2. The City to support the development of a floodlit synthetic pitch at King Lloyd Reserve as per the reserve’s master plan. This development however will be subject to further detailed investigations prior to any funding commitment being made and will need to demonstrate widespread participation outcomes as a result; and

      3. Finally, the delivery of a new local multipurpose synthetic facility in the Torquay Sports Precinct in partnership with Surf Coast Secondary College in the short term will provide more immediate provision.

    3. Increase hockey participation through improved programming - Delivering flexible and affordable hockey programs that re-engage existing members and attract new players will be key to improving participation and supporting the sport’s prosperity into the future. Actions include:

      1. Reviewing the current training and competition schedule of the regional Stead Park facility to ascertain how it may be more widely programmed; and

      2. Investigating opportunities to host more state and national level events and competitions at Stead Park to increase interest in hockey and contribute to the local economy.

    4. Embrace new formats that engage new participants - Engaging with more schools and the G21 community through improved and diversified formats including social hockey will support increased participation. Hockey Victoria has an ambitious goal of achieving 15,000 new or re-engaged participants across the state by 2020 and identifies the need to increase its offerings to meet this target. Hockey Victoria will drive this priority with assistance from local clubs and associations. Critical actions under this priority will support the facilitation, activation and delivery of hockey for greater grass roots and social participation;

    5. Adopt strategies that support the development of sustainable clubs - Support the local hockey association, Geelong Hockey Association, to develop a business plan, in conjunction with the regional strategy, that provides clear organisational and operational directions. In addition, review the structure of hockey and identify preferred management and operational models in anticipation of a new local multi-use pitch at Torquay and the proposed regional development at Armstrong Creek West. Under this priority, Hockey Victoria will also review their affiliation fees to clubs to ensure that the charges are reflective of the level of support provided; and

    6. Promote hockey in the G21 region through collective marketing strategies and initiatives - Promote hockey in the region through collective marketing strategies and initiatives along with increased support from Hockey Victoria through the appointment of a regional club development officer. This critical priority arose from consultation with associations, clubs and players who felt that greater support from Hockey Victoria was required to improve participation outcomes and strategic direction, particularly for the implementation of more non-traditional, unstructured formats of the game.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. The G21 region is forecast to experience an estimated growth of 670 traditional hockey players from 2011 to 2031. In addition to traditional participation growth, the implementation of diversified hockey formats such as social hockey should see an additional 500 new participants in the short term.

  2. At present, all competition is played at the regional hockey facility at Stead Park, Corio. While the facility is of a premier standard, travel time for competitors outside of Geelong is considered a major barrier to participation.

  3. The strategy notes that the addition of multi-purpose satellite competition surfaces outside of Greater Geelong should be considered a priority for investment, particularly within Surf Coast Shire. This recommendation will provide greater accessibility for the wider G21 population. The provision of additional satellite competition facilities is supported by Hockey Victoria and the Geelong Hockey Association who operate the Stead Park facility.

  4. In addition, the strategy recommends that disadvantaged and low socio-economic communities should be engaged through the implementation of introductory hockey programs with a specific focus on Corio and Norlane. Given the proximity of the Stead Park facility, this presents Hockey Victoria and the Geelong Hockey Association an opportunity to involve members of this community.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. There is no policy, legal or statutory implications arising from this report.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. This report aligns to Council’s priorities of ‘Improved Health and Safety of Our Community’ and ‘Informed Social Infrastructure and Planning’ as per the Council Plan 2018-22. By consulting with the community and developing a prioritised action plan with key stakeholders, the strategy will provide greater participation opportunities and health outcomes through sport. Furthermore, this plan will support and provide strategic justification through a well-developed evidence base for any future hockey infrastructure within the G21 region.


Conflict of Interest

  1. No Council officers involved in the preparation of this report or draft strategy are known to have a direct or indirect interest in matters to which this report relates.


Risk Assessment

  1. There are no notable risks associated with this report.


Environmental Implications

  1. There are no environmental implications associated with this report.


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7. Greater Geelong and the Bellarine Tourism Development Plan

Source:

Economy, Investment & Attraction - Tourism

Director:

Brett Luxford

Portfolio:

Tourism and Events


Purpose

  1. To update Council on the findings of the Greater Geelong and the Bellarine Tourism Development Plan - Final Report 2019-22 (Attachment 2 Tourism Development Plan) including current and projected visitor demand and the listing of priority projects required to maximise the output of the visitor economy until 2027.


Background

  1. The Tourism Development Plan was developed by Consultants, Urban Enterprise, and builds on the 2015-2018 Tourism Development Plan.

  2. The performance of the tourism sector has been stronger than that predicted in the previous plan and several of the identified priority projects have been realised. The aim of the updated plan is to identify key tourism products and supporting infrastructure which will meet the needs of existing and future visitors to the region.


Key Matters

  1. Current visitation to the region now exceeds 5.8 million visitors per annum with an estimated $2.2 billion economic value supporting 11,264 jobs.

  2. Based on demand modelling, future visitation is projected to increase to 7.5 million by 2027.

  3. There will be a need to deliver an additional 1,564 guest rooms in the Geelong and The Bellarine region to ensure that the region’s tourism potential is met.

  4. The Tourism Development Plan details the priority projects required to maximise the visitor economy and list these projects by six sub regions, Urban Geelong, Avalon and the You Yangs, Bellarine South, Bellarine North, Queenscliff and Point Lonsdale and Golden Plains South.

Councillor Murrihy moved, Councillor Nelson seconded -

  1. That Council:

    1. Note the current performance of the Geelong and The Bellarine visitor economy and the projected growth in visitation over the next eight to ten years, and

    2. Acknowledge the priority projects as detailed in the Greater Geelong and the Bellarine Tourism Development Plan - Final Report 2019-22 and continues to work in partnership with the tourism industry and private sector operators through Tourism Greater Geelong and The Bellarine and State and Federal Governments to realise these projects over the life of the plan.

Carried.


Attachment 1

Financial Implications

  1. The City’s primary role is one of facilitation rather than being a direct provider of tourism related infrastructure.

  2. Specific projects that have been identified in the Tourism Development Plan where Council is a funding partner (Convention and Exhibition Centre, Osborne Park redevelopment, Eastern Beach Spa Complex and Sunken Gallery etc.) are subject to Council’s budget program and processes.


Community Engagement

  1. The consultants, in developing the Tourism Development Plan, met with a wide range of potential investors, Committees of Management and relevant State and Federal Government departments and agencies. Industry forums were conducted at a sub-regional level and local plans and strategies were considered and noted.


Social Equity Considerations

  1. Tourism is about capitalising on the region’s competitive advantages and is primarily about economic activity. The region’s Visitor Economy Strategy 2017 – 2021 lists Accessible Tourism as a key priority and significant opportunity.

  2. A partnership has been established with the Australian Federation of Disability Organisations and Deakin University to work with the industry and developers to support the key objective.

  3. Tourism is a labour intensive industry with a very broad entry level. Research of the local labour force highlights a significant number of workers that work directly and indirectly benefit from a growing visitor economy.


Policy/Legal/Statutory Implications

  1. The Tourism Development Plan is consistent with Council’s Tourism Policy (approved 10 April 2018) that recognises that the visitor economy is one of the sectors within the broader Grater Geelong economy which can sustain economic growth and be further developed, enhanced and expanded.

  2. The policy highlights that Council will continue to work with industry to maximise employment and the long term economic benefits of tourism.

  3. The policy goes on to say that in order to achieve these goals and objectives, Council will:

    1. Facilitate the creation of tourism opportunities and development of tourism infrastructure while minimising its role as a direct infrastructure funder; and

    2. Actively seek State and Federal support of conferencing and other tourism related infrastructure.

  4. The Tourism Development Plan and associated marketing tools is the major advocacy and support document presented to Government and quasi Government agencies, peak industry bodies and regional development boards to seek to focus and strengthen the funding of key projects within the region.


Alignment to Council Plan

  1. The Council Plan 2018-22 states that “tourism is one of the five sectors to secure Geelong’s economic future”. Tourism plans and strategies being developed will assist in “delivering and growing our economic priorities.”

  2. Further to this, the Council Plan states that a priority is to facilitate major infrastructure and investment to enable economic growth. We will facilitate the provision of appropriate infrastructure to enable economic growth and capitalise on competitive advantage by proactively targeting and attracting new investment to Geelong and promoting our region’s benefits.

  3. A priority for Greater Geelong is to be a leading city for tourism, arts, culture and events (the visitor economy).


Conflict of Interest

  1. This report is written by the City’s Tourism Manager who is also the Executive Director of the Regional Tourism Board, Tourism Greater Geelong and The Bellarine Inc.

  2. The Tourism Development Plan was commissioned and paid for by Tourism Greater Geelong and The Bellarine Inc.

  3. The Tourism Development Plan is subject to copyright and is an independent report of Urban Enterprise (Urban Planning, Land Economics, Tourism Planning and Industry Software).

  4. The Tourism Development Plan has been considered by the Board of Tourism Greater Geelong and The Bellarine who resolved to accept the plan.


Risk Assessment

  1. Greater Geelong and The Bellarine is one of 12 official tourism regions of Victoria. Other regions also recognise the importance of growing the visitor economy and working in partnership with industry, all levels of Government and the private sector.

  2. Tourism Greater Geelong and The Bellarine continues to perform strongly and has had a long track record of excellence and is recognised as a best practice example nationally and globally.

  3. Regions in Victoria and right across Australia continue to invest heavily in tourism infrastructure development and marketing. Regions who fail to invest can experience rapid decline in both visitation and yield.

  4. The risk for Greater Geelong and The Bellarine is that the Tourism Development Plan priority projects fail to be realised with subsequent decline in destination appeal, visitation, visitor expenditure and associated employment in the visitor economy.


Environmental Implications

  1. The tourism industry is a significant consumer of energy, water and a generator of waste and emissions. In recognition of this the industry has established a number of environmental programs to reduce impact on the environment.

  2. Environmental credentials are now an important consideration by visitors and the industry has responded to the demands of the market and introduced new environmentally responsible practices to reduce their impact on environment and improve their bottom line. Tourism Greater Geelong and The Bellarine is an active participant in the Earth Check program and benchmarked against global environmental best practice targets for energy consumption and waste generation.

  3. Tourism Greater Geelong and The Bellarine organise industry forums for members to hear and learn from environmental organisations and program leaders aiming minimise environmental impact.


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Close of Meeting

As there was no further business the meeting closed at 9:01pm on Tuesday 14 May 2019.


Signed: _________________________________________

Councillor Peter Murrihy (Acting Mayor)



Date of Confirmation: _____________________________



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