Cobradah Homestead

The Cobradah Homestead houses regular hirers such as Cobradah Senior Citizens Club, Geelong Irish Society and U3A Corio Bay. 

The venue is also available for casual hire and ideal for meetings and smaller activities and birthday celebrations.

 

About Cobradah Homestead...

Originally named Blink Brae, the house was built for John Pettitt, a merchant in 1909-1910.  The park, in which the house stands, was named after John Pettitt as a councillor of the Shire of Corio and original owner of this house.

Pettitt Park is also the original site of the bell on the post for which the suburb of Bell Post Hill is named. The bell was erected by Cowie and Stead in 1836, the first homestead on Bell Post Hill. It is believed that the primary purpose of the bell was to advise the nearby residents that a ship was in they bay, presumably so that they could go to Point Henry to pick up stores and provisions.  

In 1859, when there was no further use for its warning, the owner of the bell had it shipped back to Tasmania for repairs. After repair, it was stored for some time in Geelong until it was presented to the Morongo Girls' College where it was rehung not too far from the original site. 

John Pettitt ceased to own the site by 1956 when Robert Wilson is recorded as the occupier and the Marist fathers, Maryvale, Hunters Hill, NSW as the owners. 

Mr F Venuto is noted as the owner or occupier in 1972 prior to it being purchased by the Shire of Corio. During the 1970s it was used by the Shire as the Cobradah Youth Centre. The Aboriginal word Cobradah means place on a hill.

In 1984, the homestead was converted from a youth centre to the clubrooms of the newly formed Cobradah Senior Citizens Club. At the official opening of the new clubrooms, in the former house, was held in the presence of the Shire President, Councillor Bob Dragt as well as other councillors.  It was noted that:

The completion of the new facility, which was financed by the council at a cost of $16,000 recognises the importance of the role in the community played by senior citizens.

 




Page last updated: Friday, 18 October 2019

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